Breaking Down Barriers Writing Sample

There are many ways in which two characters can overcome an internal barrier. The two characters in question are Marta Balcewicz from “The Summer of Bssz” and Alison Wisdom from “The Mothers in the Woods,” who struggle to overcome an internal barrier, with Marta striving to overcome trauma and Alison striving to overcome grief. Both characters struggle to overcome an internal barrier, but they go about it in different ways.

Marta Balcewicz is struggling with the internal barrier of guilt. She feels guilty for how she treated her mother before she died and is also struggling because she is unsure if she wants to have children (Marta-Balcewicz par 4). To overcome her guilt, Marta decides to return to her hometown and make amends with her mother’s ghost. She also starts to work on her relationship with her father and tries to connect with him deeper.

The protagonist in “The Mothers in the Woods” struggles with the internal barrier of grief. She is grieving the loss of her child and is also struggling because she is unsure if she wants to have another child. To overcome her grief, the protagonist decides to return to the woods where her child died (Alisonwisdom par 3). She also starts to work on her relationship with her husband and tries to connect with him deeper. Alison has been attending a support group for people who have lost a loved one. She has also been talking to a therapist and spending time with her friends and family.

Both characters are overcoming an internal barrier, but they are doing so in different ways. The character in “The Summer of BSSZ” is overcoming trauma, while the character in “The Mothers in the Woods” is striving to overcome grief. Both characters struggle with an internal barrier preventing them from moving on with their lives. They are both in therapy, and they are both working on accepting themselves for who they are. Marta is also working on trusting people again, and Alison is working on coming to terms with her mother’s death.

The main difference between the two characters is that one can overcome its internal barrier while the other is not. The character in “The Summer of Biz” overcomes their trauma by talking about it and seeking help from others, while the character in “The Mothers in the Woods” cannot do so and instead tries to forget it.

How The Two Character Work to Overcome Trauma

There are a few key ways trauma can be overcome from a psychoanalytic perspective. One way is through working through, which involves gradually coming to terms with the traumatic event and its aftermath. This can be done through different means, such as therapy, writing, and art. Another way is through repression, when an individual pushes the trauma memories into their unconscious mind. This may provide temporary relief but can also lead to further problems.

Both Marta Balcewicz and Alison Wisdom use different methods to overcome their traumas. Marta Balcewicz uses the process of working through by writing about her experiences in a short story. She gradually comes to terms with what happened to her and can move on with her life. On the other hand, Alison Wisdom uses repression to cope with her trauma (Alisonwisdom par 7). She pushes the memories of the event down into her unconscious mind and tries to forget about them. This may give her some relief in the short term but could also lead to further problems.

How The Two Character Work to Overcome Grief and Immaturity

One way that characters can overcome grief and immaturity is by developing a stronger sense of self-awareness. In the story “The Summer of BSSZ,” the protagonist Marta can overcome her grief and immaturity by better understanding herself and her situation. She realizes she is not responsible for her mother’s death and needs to move on with her life. In the story “The Mothers in the Woods,” the protagonist Alison can overcome her grief and immaturity by better understanding her mother’s situation. She comes to realize that her mother is not a bad person and that she is just trying to protect her.

Another way that characters can overcome grief and immaturity is by developing a stronger sense of empathy. In the story “The Summer of BSSZ,” the protagonist Marta, can overcome her grief and immaturity by empathizing with her mother. She realizes that her mother is trying to protect her and that she is not a bad person. In the story “The Mothers in the Woods,” the protagonist Alison can overcome her grief and immaturity by empathizing with her mother (Marta-Balcewicz par 10). She realizes that her mother is just trying to protect her and that she is not a bad person. Both stories show that characters can overcome grief and immaturity by developing a stronger sense of self-awareness and empathy.

Overcoming Suppression or Previously Unrealized Aspect of Their Identity

There are many ways in which two characters (or speakers) from different works can overcome suppressed or previously unrealized aspects of their identity. In “The Summer of BSSZ” by Marta Balcewicz, the protagonist overcomes her suppressed feelings of anger and resentment towards her mother by finally telling her the truth about her father’s abuse (Alisonwisdom par 3). In “The Mothers in the Woods” by Alison Wisdom, the protagonist overcomes her suppressed fear of her mother’s death by finally confronting her. In both stories, the protagonists can overcome their suppressed emotions and come to terms with the previously unrealized aspects of their identities.

Both characters in “The Summer of Biz” and “The Mothers in the Woods” overcome suppressed or previously unrealized aspects of their identity through their relationships with others. In “The Summer of Biz,” Marta Balcewicz’s character overcomes her suppressed identity by forming a relationship with her cousin, who helps her to realize her true identity. In “The Mothers in the Woods,” Alison Wisdom’s character overcomes her suppressed identity by forming a relationship with the mothers in the woods. The latter helps her to realize her true identity.

The Role Secondary Characters, The Setting, and Social Expectations Play in The Characters, Journey.

In “The Summer of Bssz,” the secondary characters, settings, and social expectations play important roles in the protagonist’s journey. The protagonist, Marta, is a young woman struggling to find her place in the world. She is constantly trying to please her mother and live up to her mother’s expectations. However, Marta is also trying to find her own identity and figure out what she wants in life. The secondary characters, settings, and social expectations all help to shape Marta’s journey.

In “The Mothers in the Woods,” the secondary characters, settings, and social expectations also play important roles in the protagonist’s journey (Marta-Balcewicz par 17). The protagonist, Alison, is a young woman struggling to come to terms with her mother’s death. She is constantly trying to please her mother and live up to her mother’s expectations. However, Alison is also trying to find her own identity and figure out what she wants in life. The secondary characters, settings, and social expectations all help to shape Alison’s journey.

Both stories explore how social expectations can affect the characters’ journeys. In “The Summer of BSSZ,” Marta’s friends can help her because they understand the societal expectations surrounding death and grief (Alisonwisdom par 15). They know it is unacceptable to show emotion in public, so they provide her with a space to express her emotions. In “The Mothers in the Woods,” the mother can also find support from her friends because they understand motherhood’s social expectations. They know it is unacceptable to show emotion in public, so they provide her with a space to express her emotions.

Both stories also explore the role of secondary characters in the characters’ journeys. In “The Summer of BSSZ,” Marta’s friends can help her because they understand her situation. They know what she is going through and can provide her with support and understanding. In “The Mothers in the Woods,” the mother can also find support from her friends because they understand her situation. They know what she is going through and can provide her with support and understanding. Both stories also explore the role of the setting in the characters’ journeys. In “The Summer of BSSZ,” the setting is important because it provides a space for Marta to grieve. In “The Mothers in the Woods,” the setting is also important because it provides a space for the mother to heal.

Conscious or Unconscious Decision Helped Characters Work Towards a Freer Way of Life.

The two characters Marta Balcewicz from “The Summer of Biz” and the mother from “The Mother in the Woods” work towards a freer way of life, but they differ in how they go about it. Marta Balcewicz is a young woman trying to find her way in the world. She is working toward a freer way of life by leaving her home and exploring the world. She is making conscious decisions to leave her home and explore new places. These decisions help her to find a freer way of life. The mothers in “The Mother’s in the Woods” also work toward a freer way of life (Marta-Balcewicz par 19). They are doing this by leaving their homes and going into the woods. They make unconscious decisions to leave their homes and go into the woods. These decisions help them to find a freer way of life.

Marta Balcewicz is more of a free spirit. She is less concerned with the expectations of others and more concerned with living in the moment. This allows her to be more open to new experiences and to take risks. This approach leads to some setbacks but ultimately helps her to find a more authentic way of life. The mother from “The Mother in the Woods” is more guarded. She is worried about what others will think of her and her choices. This leads her to be more cautious and less open to new experiences. As a result, she feels trapped, and her journey to a freer way of life is more difficult.

The psychoanalytic perspective would say that the mothers in “The Mother’s in the Woods” make decisions based on their unconscious desires (Alisonwisdom par 17). They are leaving their homes and going into the woods because they are looking for something they cannot find in their everyday lives. They are looking for a way to escape their everyday life constraints. Marta Balcewicz, on the other hand, is making decisions based on her conscious desires. She is leaving her home and exploring the world because she wants to find something new and exciting. She is looking for a way to expand her horizons and find a new way of life.

Symbol That Reveals Characters’ Struggle, Success, Or Motivation To Change

The two characters Marta Balcewicz from “The Summer of Biz” and the mother from “The Mother in the Woods” struggle with their pasts and are motivated to change their lives for the better.

Marta is struggling with her memories of the Solidarity movement in Poland and the loss of her friends during the regime change. She is also struggling with her sense of guilt for not doing more to help her friends. The symbol that reveals her struggle is the rose, which symbolizes love and hope. The rose also represents her friend, who was killed during the regime change.

The mothers in “The Woods” struggle with their war memories and lost children. They are also struggling with their sense of guilt for not being able to protect their children. The symbol that reveals their struggle is the forest, which symbolizes death and despair. The animals also represent the mothers in the forest, symbolizing strength and resilience.

Both characters are motivated to change their lives for the better. Marta is motivated by her love for her friends and her desire to make a difference in the world. The mothers are motivated by their love for their children and desire to protect them.

Conclusion

There are many ways in which two characters can overcome an internal barrier. In the story “The Summer of BSSZ”, Marta Balcewicz strives to overcome her trauma by seeking a new place to live. She moves to a small town in Poland and starts a new life. However, she is still haunted by her past and is constantly reminded of it by the people around her. In the story “The Mothers in the Woods,” Alison Wisdom tries to overcome her grief by moving to a new town and starting a new life. In “The Summer of BSSZ,” the secondary characters constantly remind Marta of her past and are not very supportive of her. The setting also reminds her of her past, and she is constantly reminded of the trauma she experienced. In “The Mothers in the Woods,” the secondary characters support Alison and are there for her when she needs them. The setting is also very supportive and helps her to move on from her grief. The symbol that reveals her struggle is the rose, which symbolizes love and hope. The rose also represents her friend, who was killed during the regime change. The symbol that reveals their struggle is the forest, which symbolizes death and despair. The animals also represent the mothers in the woods, symbolizing strength and resilience.

Works Cited

Alisonwisdom. “The Mothers in the Woods: Alison Wisdom.” Catapult, Catapult, 23 Nov. 2021, https://catapult.co/stories/the-mothers-in-the-woods-short-story-alison-wisdom.

Marta-Balcewicz. “The Summer of BSSZ: Marta Balcewicz.” Catapult, Catapult, 23 Nov. 2021, https://catapult.co/stories/marta-balcewicz-short-story-the-summer-of-bssz.

British Commonwealth Impacting The Caribbean Essay Example For College

When the Caribbean comes to mind, most think of trips, touring, and time-wasting. But most people never stop to think about the ancient history of the Caribbean colonization, slavery and British Commonwealth. Before the colonization of the great European countries, the languages of the Amerindians were spoken throughout the islands. After the Amerindians were forced off the Caribbean by the Europeans, the language of the different Europeans came into existence in the Caribbean. But mostly, the enslaved people were brought to the Caribbean from all regions of Africa, resulting in many different languages and cultures. The languages of enslaved people were shaped by the new environments and how the Europeans spoke their languages. Eventually, after slavery and colonization ended, the British Commonwealth was formed to foster peace, democracy and prosperity in the member countries, including Caribbean countries. Also, members of the Commonwealth are governed by three main values; respect, tolerance and understanding. It would make great sense for all Caribbean countries under the British Common Wealth to leave their colonial past behind.

It is essential and logical for Caribbean countries to let go of the hurt brought by colonialism and slavery to keep them on the right track of chasing common interests like other members of their British Commonwealth. When the Caribbean countries under the British Commonwealth leave their colonial past behind, it demonstrates their understanding of situations that cannot be fixed. One of the key values observed by members of the Commonwealth is understanding (“Commonwealth Charter.”). Caribbean countries should be able to demonstrate their understanding by embracing diversity. Diversity can only be achieved when the countries put aside their colonial past and embrace countries that have descendants of their colonial past. Letting go of the colonial past is logical in terms of achieving the goals of the Commonwealth. The goal of the Commonwealth is to achieve democracy, peace and prosperity in all states. It can be achievable when members understand that human dignity should be respected regardless of the past. If Caribbean countries keep holding on to the colonial past and are still members of the Commonwealth, it would be hard for them to live by the values. Consequently, it would become hard to achieve the members’ common interests. Therefore, regarding the values of the Commonwealth, it is logical that Caribbean countries let go of their colonial past, considering the British Commonwealth’s values and the members’ shared interests.

Also, despite the painful happenings in the past decades, Commonwealth is focused on ensuring that Caribbean countries grow economically. It demonstrates the goodwill of members of the Commonwealth towards each other. Caribbean countries that are part of the Commonwealth share the advantage of trading amongst members at lower costs than countries that are not part of the Commonwealth. They trade at 20% lower costs than none commonwealth countries (“Op-Ed: Working Together Will Boost Caribbean Exports.”). This alone is evidence of the goodwill towards Caribbean countries, considering that nothing can be done to change the past, but the British Commonwealth is doing something to change the future. The economic status of Caribbean countries is changing due to trade opportunities offered by the Commonwealth to its members. Caribbean exports are smaller portions, and the British Commonwealth helps the countries export to Europe and the UK by combining members’ exports; British Commonwealth gives loans to members, including Caribbean countries, to boost their economies. However, during challenging moments, Caribbean countries fail to pay the debt. Commonwealth steps in to help the countries find solutions to step back economically as they pay the debt (“Commonwealth and UNDP Work with the Caribbean on Debt Challenges.”). In addition, Commonwealth has made Caribbean countries stay united through economic cooperation and integration (cite). Gradually the economy of Caribbean countries becomes stronger. Therefore, Caribbean countries under the British Commonwealth should consider letting go of the colonial past and fully joining the journey of the British Commonwealth that looks forward to bettering their economy.

Lastly, Caribbean countries under the British Commonwealth should let go of their colonial past and focus on the contemporary world where the British Commonwealth seeks to promote and protect human rights. The painful colonial past when descendants of Caribbean citizens were denied basic fundamental human rights cannot be fixed. It cannot be fixed by dwelling on the past because the hands of the clock keep going forward. However, there is hope from the British Commonwealth that looks forward to promoting and protecting human rights to ensure that people in the Caribbean are comfortable. The Caribbean States are too small to sufficiently participate in “ international human rights mechanisms and implementing international obligation.” (The Commonwealth, pg. 30 ). It is also a challenge for the states to achieve national human rights institutions. The British Commonwealth is focused on helping the state participate in international human rights by requiring the states in terms of technology so that they do not have to be present all the time in Geneva. Also, the fifth goal of SDG is slowly being achieved as girls in the Caribbean citizens are being empowered and gender equality is embraced because of the influence of the British Commonwealth. Ensuring that human rights are embraced and protected is a step that focuses on creating a better future than the colonial past of the Caribbean people. Therefore, there is no need to hold on to the painful past when they are under an organization seeking to better their lives.

Conclusively, It would make great sense for all Caribbean countries under the British Commonwealth to leave their colonial past behind. Regarding the values of the Commonwealth, it is logical that Caribbean countries let go of their colonial past, considering the British Commonwealth’s values and the members’ shared interests. Also, Caribbean countries under the British Commonwealth should consider letting go of the colonial past and fully joining the journey of the British Commonwealth that looks forward to bettering their economy. Lastly, Caribbean countries under the British Commonwealth should let go of their colonial past and focus on the contemporary world where the British Commonwealth seeks to promote and protect human rights.

Works Cited

“Commonwealth Charter.” Commonwealth, https://thecommonwealth.org/charter.

“Commonwealth and UNDP Work with the Caribbean on Debt Challenges.” Commonwealth, 2013, https://thecommonwealth.org/news/commonwealth-and-undp-work-caribbean-debt-challenges.

“Op-Ed: Working Together Will Boost Caribbean Exports.” Commonwealth, https://thecommonwealth.org/news/op-ed-working-together-will-boost-caribbean-exports.

“Our Work.” Commonwealth, https://thecommonwealth.org/our-work.

The Commonwealth. The small States and the Commonwealth. https://thecommonwealth.org/sites/default/files/inline/SmallStatesandtheCommonwealth2017_1.pdf.

Budget Negotiations And Communication Sample Essay

Healthcare prosperity relies on efficient budgeting and communication. Communication is crucial in the healthcare workplace since it is essential in making decisions and actions (Helmold et al., 2022). Healthcare facilities provide quality health to individuals while maximizing returns and minimizing expenditures. Quality care delivery determines the patient’s retention in a health facility. Poor quality health care delivery lowers the facility patient’s retention, resulting in low returns. Healthcare facilities aim to balance the expenditures and returns to fund medical equipment that contributes to the quality of care delivery to individuals (Jaffe S, 2017). However, healthcare managers design effective operating budgeting to acquire the necessary equipment (Kilaru et al., 2022). Auditing the healthcare budget involves strategies for checking expenditures to reduce and optimize returns. Proper budgeting controls the organization’s expenditure on liabilities that do not add value to quality care delivery. The budgeting would cost $2 209 906. The budgeting will cater for a 35-bed hospital unit with 20 full-time equivalent staff. In addition, the budgeting will also cater to the purchase of equipment. The workload was calculated based on total capacity. Assuming all the 35 beds are occupied, employing 20 staff members, each serving a 12-hour shift, would result in a 1 to 1.75 nurse-to-patient ratio.

The plan addresses factors that are likely to affect staffing and productivity. The plan addresses the organization’s objectives, ensuring the delivery of quality healthcare to individuals. The organization’s goal is subject to changes depending on the prevailing conditions and priorities. In addition, the plan will address healthcare policies that govern reimbursement, healthcare spending, and revenue generation. The competition for funding from other healthcare organizations will likely influence the particular budget. Other significant factors include staff overtime, extra shifts, and turnover. Therefore, an effective plan must remain relevant despite emerging factors.

Encouraging in-service training would ensure the Staff undergoes professional development while delivering health care services as usual. Training would control losses associated with the training (McGregor et al., 2019). The proposed staffing levels will affect organizational goals by providing more resources and opportunities for employees to perform their duties efficiently. The additional staff members would also allow managers to delegate responsibilities to them. In addition, the proposed staffing levels will improve productivity at all levels.

The financing plan would boost healthcare delivery. For instance, the patients in the demographics with Medicare in the rural area include 15.6% and 46.9% Medicare. About 20% of the visit involves social workers. Proper financing in healthcare will boost healthcare staffing and help treat moderate-to-severe chronic diseases.

The unit’s primary equipment requirements include an ECG machine, an ultrasound machine, a patient monitor, and infusion pumps. The existing ECG and ultrasound machines, in particular, require replacement because they are old and defective. The unit does not have enough patient monitors and infusion pumps, so more must be purchased. Research and quality advancement to reduce losses incurred by caring for elderly patients is one of the outstanding ongoing expenses.

The equipment and services will contribute to organizational goals as they will help reduce production costs, improve product quality and reduce waste. The equipment and services lower the expenditure on purchasing different items that are not required, such as X-rays and blood tests. In addition, the equipment plays a significant role in delivering quality care. The management provided information on the most pressing needs of the unit, including staff salaries and benefits. The Staff revealed deficiencies in staffing requirements, health care equipment, and unmet needs. Benchmark data helped ensure the budget is realistic and consistent with the overall healthcare spending. The data obtained from the various primary sources are up-to-date and reliable because it reflects the current state of the hospital unit.

The hospital unit comprises 35 beds and requires 20 full-time staff. The budgeting will cost would cost $2, 209,906. The salaries and staff benefits would cost $2 151 333. Salaries entail overtime, extra shift, Staff recruitment, and pension. The equipment purchases would cost $17 373 and entail an ECG machine, ultrasound, Infusion pumps, and patient monitor. In addition, the budgeting includes operational expenses, such as Staff professional development and training, Equipment repair and maintenance, Research and quality improvement, and Travel, totaling $41 200.

The manager can gather information from stakeholders to ensure the project maximizes available resources per their expectations, needs, and limitations. The managers can also gather funding for labor and equipment information as a consideration when designing and creating the budget (Mladenović & Ćalić, 2021). Most executive leaders are likely to respond positively to the budget because it identifies the hospital unit’s most pressing needs. The budget excludes any nice-to-have items to guarantee that facility resources are focused on the most critical items, equipment, and services. Furthermore, the budget is based on a thorough and thorough assessment of the unit’s main requirements (Aguilera & Dickey, 2021). As a result, the executive leaders have every reason to offer ideas and approve budgeting.

The information used in the design and development of the budget was obtained from medical and patient records, hospital management, Staff, assessment of the workplace environment, and benchmark data. Medical and patient records identify the impact of current Staff and equipment on safety and quality of care. The management provided information on the most pressing needs of the unit, including staff salaries and benefits. Encouraging in-service training would ensure the Staff undergoes professional development while delivering health care services. Therefore, the strategies would ensure minimum and efficient spending on the supplies and uphold the budget’s relevance and feasibility.

References

Aguilera, L., & Dickey, E. (2021). Dress rehearsal budget planning and resource requirements. A Guide to Healthcare Facility Dress Rehearsal Simulation Planning: Simplifying the Complex, 99-106. doi:10.1108/978-1-80117-554-820211010

Helmold, M., Dathe, T., & Hummel, F. (2022). Nonverbal communication in negotiations. Successful Negotiations, 123-144. doi:10.1007/978-3-658-35701-6_6

Jaffe S. (2017). High stakes for research in US 2018 budget negotiations. Lancet (London, England)390(10099), pp. 1017–1018. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32396-6

Kilaru, A. S., Crider, C. R., Chiang, J., Fassas, E., & Sapra, K. J. (2022). Health Care Leaders’ Perspectives on the Maryland All-Payer Model. JAMA health forum3(2), e214920. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamahealthforum.2021.4920

McGregor, B., Belton, A., Henry, T. L., Wrenn, G., & Holden, K. B. (2019). Improving Behavioral Health Equity through Cultural Competence Training of Health Care Providers. Ethnicity & disease29(Suppl 2), pp. 359–364. https://doi.org/10.18865/ed.29.S2.359

Mladenović, A., & Ćalić, J. (2021). Determining seismic hazard in slowly deforming region: Can we gather enough information from Karst caves? doi:10.5194/egusphere-egu21-8723