Death Penalty Discussion Essay Example

Word Count: 1715Is the Death Penalty Right or Wrong?The idea of putting another human to death is hard to completely fathom. The physical mechanics involved in the act of execution are easy to grasp, but the emotions involved in carrying out a death sentence on another person, regardless of how much they deserve it, is beyond my own understanding. I know it must be painful, dehumanizing, and sickening. However, this act is sometimes necessary and it is our responsibility as a society to see that it is done.

Opponents of capital punishment have basically four arguments. The first is that there is a possibility of error. However, the chancethat there might be an error is separate from the issue of whether thedeath penalty can be justified or not. If an error does occur, and aninnocent person is executed, then the problem lies in the court system,not in the death penalty. Furthermore, most activities in our world, inwhich humans are involved, possess a possibility of injury or death. Construction, sports, driving, and air travel all offer the possibility ofaccidental death even though the highest levels of precautions are taken. These activities continue to take place, and continue to occasionally takehuman lives, because we have all decided, as a society, that theadvantages outweigh the unintended loss. We have also decided that theadvantages of having dangerous murderers removed from our society outweighthe losses of the offender. The second argument against capital punishment is that it isunfair in its administration. Statistics show that the poor andminorities are more likely to receive the death penalty. Once again, thisis a separate issue. It can’t be disputed sadly, the rich are more likely to get off with alesser sentence, and this bias is wrong. However, this is yet anotherproblem of our current court system. The racial and economic bias is nota valid argument against the death penalty. It is an argument against thecourts and their unfair system of sentencing. The third argument is actually a rebuttal to a claim made by somesupporters of the death penalty. The claim is that the threat of capitalpunishment reduces violent crimes. Opponents of the death penalty do notagree and have a valid argument when they say, “The claims that capitalpunishment reduces violent crime is inconclusive and certainly notproven.” I am not refuting this accusation. In fact, statistics show that thedeath penalty neither lowers or raises the incidence of violent crimes. Iam not a supporter of the death penalty because it might scare potentialcriminals into thinking twice before they murdered someone (though itwould be nice if it did). I support the death penalty because it removesindividuals who threaten the lives of our citizens. The fourth argument is that the length of stay on death row, withits endless appeals, delays, technicalities, and retrials, keep a personwaiting for death for years on end. It is both cruel and costly. This isthe least credible argument against capital punishment. The main cause ofsuch inefficiencies is the appeals process, which allows capital cases tobounce back and forth between state and federal courts for years on end.

If supporting a death row inmate for the rest their life costs less thanputting them to death, and ending their financial burden on society, thenthe problem lies in the court system, not in the death penalty. As forthe additional argument, that making a prisoner wait for years to beexecuted is cruel, then would not waiting for death in prison for the restof your life be just as cruel, as in the case of life imprisonment withoutparole. Many Americans will tell you why they are in favor of the deathpenalty. It is what they deserve. It prevents them from ever murderingagain. It removes the burden from taxpayers. We all live in a societywith the same basic rights and guarantees. We have the right to life,liberty, and the pursuit of happiness with equal opportunities. This isthe basis for our society. It is the foundation on which everything elseis built upon. When someone willfully and flagrantly attacks thisfoundation by murdering another, robbing them of all they are, and allthey will ever be, then that person can no longer be a part of thissociety. The only method that completely separates cold blooded murderersfrom our society is the death penalty. As the 20th century comes to a close, it is evident that ourjustice system is in need of reform. This reform will shape the future ofour country, and we can not jump to quick solutions such as theelimination of the death penalty. As of now, the majority of Americansupport the death penalty as an effective solution of punishment. Untilthis opinion becomes the minority, America will continue to use the thisapproach, and I will continue to support the death penalty.

“An eye for an eye,” are what some Americans would say concerningthe death penalty. Supporters of the death penalty ask the question, “Whyshould I, an honest hardworking taxpayer, have to pay to support amurderer for the rest of their natural life? Why not execute them andsave society the cost of their keep?” Many Americans believe that thedeath penalty is wrong. However, it seems obvious to some Americans thatthe death penalty is a just and proper way to handle convicted murderers.

Is the Death Penalty Right or Wrong?The idea of putting another human to death is hard to completely fathom. The physical mechanics involved in the act of execution are easy to grasp, but the emotions involved in carrying out a death sentence on another person, regardless of how much they deserve it, is beyond my own understanding. I know it must be painful, dehumanizing, and sickening. However, this act is sometimes necessary and it is our responsibility as a society to see that it is done.

Opponents of capital punishment have basically four arguments. The first is that there is a possibility of error. However, the chancethat there might be an error is separate from the issue of whether thedeath penalty can be justified or not. If an error does occur, and aninnocent person is executed, then the problem lies in the court system,not in the death penalty. Furthermore, most activities in our world, inwhich humans are involved, possess a possibility of injury or death. Construction, sports, driving, and air travel all offer the possibility ofaccidental death even though the highest levels of precautions are taken. These activities continue to take place, and continue to occasionally takehuman lives, because we have all decided, as a society, that theadvantages outweigh the unintended loss. We have also decided that theadvantages of having dangerous murderers removed from our society outweighthe losses of the offender. The second argument against capital punishment is that it isunfair in its administration. Statistics show that the poor andminorities are more likely to receive the death penalty. Once again, thisis a separate issue. It can’t be disputed sadly, the rich are more likely to get off with alesser sentence, and this bias is wrong. However, this is yet anotherproblem of our current court system. The racial and economic bias is nota valid argument against the death penalty. It is an argument against thecourts and their unfair system of sentencing. The third argument is actually a rebuttal to a claim made by somesupporters of the death penalty. The claim is that the threat of capitalpunishment reduces violent crimes. Opponents of the death penalty do notagree and have a valid argument when they say, “The claims that capitalpunishment reduces violent crime is inconclusive and certainly notproven.” I am not refuting this accusation. In fact, statistics show that thedeath penalty neither lowers or raises the incidence of violent crimes. Iam not a supporter of the death penalty because it might scare potentialcriminals into thinking twice before they murdered someone (though itwould be nice if it did). I support the death penalty because it removesindividuals who threaten the lives of our citizens. The fourth argument is that the length of stay on death row, withits endless appeals, delays, technicalities, and retrials, keep a personwaiting for death for years on end. It is both cruel and costly. This isthe least credible argument against capital punishment. The main cause ofsuch inefficiencies is the appeals process, which allows capital cases tobounce back and forth between state and federal courts for years on end.

If supporting a death row inmate for the rest their life costs less thanputting them to death, and ending their financial burden on society, thenthe problem lies in the court system, not in the death penalty. As forthe additional argument, that making a prisoner wait for years to beexecuted is cruel, then would not waiting for death in prison for the restof your life be just as cruel, as in the case of life imprisonment withoutparole. Many Americans will tell you why they are in favor of the deathpenalty. It is what they deserve. It prevents them from ever murderingagain. It removes the burden from taxpayers. We all live in a societywith the same basic rights and guarantees. We have the right to life,liberty, and the pursuit of happiness with equal opportunities. This isthe basis for our society. It is the foundation on which everything elseis built upon. When someone willfully and flagrantly attacks thisfoundation by murdering another, robbing them of all they are, and allthey will ever be, then that person can no longer be a part of thissociety. The only method that completely separates cold blooded murderersfrom our society is the death penalty. As the 20th century comes to a close, it is evident that ourjustice system is in need of reform. This reform will shape the future ofour country, and we can not jump to quick solutions such as theelimination of the death penalty. As of now, the majority of Americansupport the death penalty as an effective solution of punishment. Untilthis opinion becomes the minority, America will continue to use the thisapproach, and I will continue to support the death penalty.

“An eye for an eye,” are what some Americans would say concerningthe death penalty. Supporters of the death penalty ask the question, “Whyshould I, an honest hardworking taxpayer, have to pay to support amurderer for the rest of their natural life? Why not execute them andsave society the cost of their keep?” Many Americans believe that thedeath penalty is wrong. However, it seems obvious to some Americans thatthe death penalty is a just and proper way to handle convicted murderers.

Effectiveness Of The Articles

The Articles of Confederation were ineffective in providing the United States with a strong government. These articles lacked the ability to tax, regulate trade, and establish all branches of government. Moreover, the thirteen states operated independently like individual nations, with the national government having minimal control over them.

According to Document C, Congress had insufficient funds to pay the bonuses owed to the army. Consequently, the army became dissatisfied with the lack of action and believed that they were being treated unfairly. The delay in payment was so prolonged that the army began to doubt whether they would ever receive their due compensation. This situation clearly demonstrates the urgent necessity for the national government to have the authority to impose taxes.

In Document D, it is evident that the national government has limited control. The document demonstrates the struggles faced by the U.S. in attempting to remove British troops from American soil. The British showed disregard for the U.S. government due to its lack of power, as the states held all the authority. The thirteen states acted independently, resembling separate nations, and operated according to their own preferences.

Document G shows the dissatisfaction of the people with their national government under the Articles of Confederation. John Jay, the Secretary of Foreign Affairs and a skilled negotiator, expresses this discontent in a letter to George Washington. He predicts a possible revolt, crisis, or revolution and emphasizes his uneasiness and the need for change. Shays rebellion marked a turning point as it highlighted the necessity for a new national government; the rebellion was directed against the Massachusetts government.

The Articles of Confederation had both positive and negative aspects, but the negative aspects were much more significant. The increasing tension in ideas, thoughts, and events made it clear to everyone that change was necessary. The extent and nature of the change were the only matters in question, not the need for change itself. Some believed a slight revision to the Articles was sufficient, while others advocated for creating an entirely new document and government.

Lottery By Shirley Jackson

While the setting of Shirley Jacksons, The Lottery, takes place on a clear,sunny, June day, it does not take long for the skies to turn gray as sheintroduces the readers to the black box. The black box is the central symbol ofthe short story. It suggest both death and necessity of change due to acombination of the passage of time and population expansion. The reference tothe black box as a symbol of death can be seen in many instances throughoutthe story. For example, when the box is first introduced, “the villagers kepttheir distance, leaving a space between themselves and the stool ( which the boxwas placed on).” People are afraid and the distance they kept was not due totheir fear of the box, but of what the box stood for . . . death. This point isfurther illustrated through the manner in which the box was stored. “The restof the year, the box was put away, sometimes one place, sometimes another; ithad spent one year in Mr. Graves barn and another year underfoot in the postoffice, and sometimes it was set on a shelf in the Martin grocery and leftthere.” Death is not something that people deal with everyday. Human beingsdeal with death very similar to the way that the towns people stored the blackbox. People place their experiences with death in different rooms and shelves oftheir hearts. The black box also symbolizes the need for a new tradition and thereluctance of the townspeople to accept change. The black box is a symbol of thelottery itself. The physical appearance of the box suggest that it was not onlythe black box that needed to be replaced but the tradition of the lottery.

“The black box grew shabbier each year; by now it was no longer completelyblack but splintered badly along one side to show the original wood color, andin some places faded or stained.” As the physical appearance of the black boxdeteriorated so did the appropriateness of the tradition. Takash 2 Mr. Adamsrevealed in his conversation with Old Man Warner that many of the townssurrounding them had already ceased the lottery tradition and many more were inthe process of discussing it, thus further proving that the lottery has lost itssignificance. In reply to Mr. Adams remarks, Old Man Warner says, “Theresalways been a lottery .” and “Nothing but trouble in that, pack of youngfools.” Old Man Warners response to Mr. Adams exemplifies the unwillingnessof the townspeople to change the tradition and the townspeoples failure toaccept the need for change. The dark clouds that came into view when the box wasfirst introduced become a full fledged storm at the conclusion of the story. Theblack box became the ultimate symbol of death as it is the very vechile thatdelivers the unfortunate winners prize which is death by stoning. The stormof immoral and unethical actions is further propelled by the momentum that camefrom the townspeoples extreme degree of self interest. The terrible traditionwas carried out once again. Instead of considering the effect that the traditionhad on their fellow man they were grateful that the black box had blessed themwith their own lives. As far as they were concerned the sky was blue and the sunwas still shining.

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