Gluten Free Diet: Explanation And Benefits Free Writing Sample

A gluten-free diet is a way of life for the person with celiac disease, a digestive disorder due to severe gluten sensitivity. No one needs to tell them to stay completely off of gluten, the protein component found in many grains. But what about people with joint pain, brain fog, loss of balance or other neurological and auto-immune disorders? All of these problems have also been linked with gluten consumption. One out of every 133 healthy adults in the United States, (University of Chicago Celiac Disease Program 2006), has celiac disease and accompanying digestive problems if they eat any foods with gluten.

Gluten is the protein component of several grains. A variety of factors, including genetic inheritance, infections, liver function and even a summer birthday can influence gluten sensitivity. My research proposal will be THE BENEFITS OF A GLUTEN FREE DIET. A gluten-free diet is not only a way of life for the person with celiac disease, a digestive disorder due to severe gluten sensitivity. My thesis we present strong, current, and scientific evidence to express the growing concerns with gluten. No one needs to tell anyone to stay completely off of gluten, the protein component found in many grains.

But what about people with joint pain, brain fog, loss of balance or other neurological and auto-immune disorders? All of these problems have also been linked with gluten consumption. One out of every 133 healthy adults in the United States, (University of Chicago Celiac Disease Program 2006), has celiac disease and accompanying digestive problems if they eat any foods with gluten. Gluten is the protein component of several grains. A variety of factors, including genetic inheritance, infections, liver function and even a summer birthday can influence gluten sensitivity.

Essay On The Transition Of An RN To The Role Of An APN

The transition of an RN to the role of an APN can be exciting and at the same timed apprehensive. It is essential that RNs who chose to transition roles into becoming an APN is aware of the basic elements of the crucial role of the APN in the healthcare industry. The APN functions in the capacity as a healthcare provider and is viewed by the society as an individual who can treat, educate, advocate, and provide healthcare services. Therefore the APN ought to have the ability to identify possibly barriers that patients may face which may impact their decision to be compliant with the treatment regimen established for their well being. According to Pender, Murdaugh and Parsons (2011), the Health Belief Model (HBM) has been widely used in preventive care such as self breast examinations and condom use. The HBM further discuss the fact that people may have the belief that they are not susceptible to a certain disease therefore will not be involved in taking positive preventive actions to avoid such illness.

As RN students studying to be APNs, preventive care is a key aspect of care the APN provides and it is essential that we are cognizant of this piece and incorporate it into our training and practice to become highly qualified APNs. In addition, to be adequately prepared for the APN role, RN students must aim to understand what the patient’s perception of their current health status is and current beliefs they have about their illness or conditions. This will enable the APN to adequately teach and guide patients and help them change certain risky behaviors such as smoking or poor eating habits that can lead to illness such as cancer or diabetes.

In order for a behavior to be accepted, the individual needs to believe that “new” behaviors prevail over the continuation of the old behavior. For example, lack of exercise can lead to obesity vs. frequent exercise will maintain a healthy heart and live a healthy life. Change is hard; however it can be also be good especially when it involves living an illness-free life. APN have the ability to positively influence patients and RN students studying to become APN must be willing to learn new things/concepts, get involved in research and go the extra mile in obtaining information that will positively benefit patient behaviors.

Pressures To Belong In Society

Belonging refers to the state of feeling accepted and at ease within a particular place or group. As John O’Donohue eloquently puts it, this longing to belong is not merely a yearning for attachment, but rather an intuitive understanding that genuine belonging provides a nurturing and transformative space. This exploration of belonging encompasses various dimensions, such as societal pressures to conform or reject conformity, the disconnect between superficial belonging and authenticity, and the significance of belonging to a specific location.

The concept of pressures to belong in society is illustrated in various ways in the play The Crucible by Arthur Miller (1953), the novel Tomorrow, When The War Began by John Marsden (1994), and the poem “Identity” by Julio Noboa Polanco (2007). In The Crucible, Salem society enforces strict religious rules and beliefs, compelling its members to conform. Miller uses the metaphor of a fortress to depict theology as a battle, emphasizing the struggle individuals face to belong in Salem. This metaphor further illustrates the idea that adherence to societal norms is necessary for belonging.

The novel Tomorrow, When The War Began portrays the concept of societal pressures to belong through Ellie’s diary entries and the invasion they face. Ellie and her friends are compelled to come together and resist, highlighting the external pressure they experience. Additionally, the invaders feel pressured to take control of the country in order to establish their own sense of belonging. The metaphor “We’ve all had to rewrite the scripts of our lives…” symbolizes the group’s obligation to fight for their rightful place in society amidst the invasion.

This metaphor illustrates how individuals sometimes feel the need to create a new group to which they belong because they do not fit in anywhere else. They are compelled to unite and support each other in order to regain a sense of belonging within the larger society. On the other hand, the poem “Identity” examines the concept of an individual resisting societal expectations to conform. The line “Clinging on cliffs, like an eagle wind-wavering above high, jagged rocks” exemplifies the use of allegory in the poem.

Embedded in this text is the concept of using animal behavior to symbolize freedom and resistance against societal conformity. The portrayal of jagged rocks signifies the burdensome societal pressures individuals face in order to fit in. The underlying message advocates for the release of one’s true essence to achieve a sense of belonging, counteracting the temptation to succumb to the aforementioned pressures. The quote “At that moment only a bullet could have separated me from those people” serves as a metaphor highlighting the strong bond and shared identity experienced within a group.

This suggests that even in the most dire circumstances, pressure can compel us to seek novel ways of finding acceptance. Despite not fitting into the society that was invaded, they succeeded in establishing their own community where they felt like they belonged. The friends have discovered a profound connection with one another that shapes their personal sense of belonging. In contrast, The Crucible portrays the dark aspects of being part of a group through the portrayal of the girls.

Mary Warren’s decision to align herself with a particular group is influenced by a longing for power and a fear of Abigail. Her use of intense language, such as “I’ll not hang with you! I love god, I love god,” demonstrates her elevated status within the girls’ circle, which she lacks in the Proctor household. However, the main factor leading her away from Proctor is Abigail’s authority and the peer pressure exerted by the other girls. This group of girls is solely united by their shared fear, rather than a sense of belonging in Salem society.

The poem “identity” highlights the negative perspective on belonging to a group and how it may appear positive on the surface, but is actually detrimental. The metaphor “Always watered, fed, guarded, admired, but harnessed to a pot of dirt” conveys that individuals within a group conform and suppress their true selves in order to fit in. It depicts how belonging to a group can sometimes have a negative impact, as the group exerts control and influence over others’ growth in society. This pertains to the concept of belonging to a place.

The novel Tomorrow, When The War Began explores the theme of belonging through the group of 7 teenagers who find a sense of belonging in their hideout called Hell. Hell provides a safe space away from the invading country, allowing them to belong somewhere when there is nowhere else to go. Similar to the characters in the book, we often experience a sense of belonging through our connection to certain places. “Hell is a cauldron of boulders and trees…. It is a wild place…The cliffs surrounding it are awe-inspiring, reaching heights of hundreds of meters in some areas.”

There is a series of small cliffs called Satan’s Steps that descend into it. The usage of imagery in this excerpt, created through the extended metaphor, depicts the feeling of belonging that Ellie and her friends experience in Hell. It demonstrates how despite the invasion and lack of belonging, they still have a powerful attachment to the location. It contributes to the concept of belonging to a place and how having a type of refuge can offer a sense of belonging. Oftentimes, our connection to places contributes to our feeling of belonging.

The text suggests that Abigail and the group of girls have control over the proceedings in the court of Salem. Their use of the phrase “Abby, Abby, I’ll never hurt you more” creates hysteria in the act. Through fake outbursts and intimidation, Abigail and the girls often manipulate the court, as seen with Marry Warren. This highlights the power and sense of belonging they have within the court. Similarly, in the poem “identity,” belonging to a certain place is portrayed positively. The metaphor “let them be as flowers in a garden” represents content individuals who belong to a specific place. This reveals that belonging can be achieved through strong connections with places. When individuals have this connection, they can freely be themselves and experience a sense of belonging. In conclusion, the texts The Crucible, Tomorrow, When The War Began and “Identity” all illustrate that belonging is not inherently good or bad. The relationship between belonging and the individual is heavily influenced by the context in which their connection is formed.

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