Healthcare Management And Leadership Free Sample

Nurses encounter ethical challenges daily. Nurses must do what is best for the patient, which includes following their instructions. Even though nurses do not always agree with the wishes of the patient or family, it is their responsibility to carry them out. Every day, nurses support patients in a variety of ways, including ensuring their care, giving them a voice, and educating them.

I once was in a circumstance when I had to represent a patient. I was looking after a 17-year-old boy who was suffering from terminal cancer. He was frightened that he might die dreadfully without having enough time to say goodbye to his loved one, so he sought out information about physician-assisted suicide. As his nurse, I took the time to explain the procedure to him. I explained that physician-assisted suicide is when someone with a chronic illness, such as cancer, takes steps to end their life. In addition, I emphasized that physician-assisted suicide could help a patient end their suffering.

The right-to-die rules, according to Marquis and Huston (2009), apply to individuals above the age of 18 who are capable of making medical decisions. Because euthanasia for children is illegal in the United States, it would be illegal for other medical professionals and me to provide such teaching to someone under the age of 18.

Physicians, psychologists, pharmacists, and community health workers are among the interprofessional teams that help patients. Collaboration and patient safety are two of their responsibilities. Collaboration has a direct impact on patient outcomes and safety, but failure to collaborate might result in errors (Marquis and Huston, 2009). Effective communication amongst interprofessional team members is also required for collaboration.

Nurse supervisors, in essence, play a critical role in patient advocacy and safety. They are in charge of providing a healthy and safe atmosphere that promotes patient engagement and supports the work of healthcare providers (Marquis and Huston, 2009). As a result, nurse managers play an important role in developing a professional atmosphere and culture where healthcare practitioners can advance their careers while improving patient safety and outcomes.

Managers and executives in healthcare companies can improve the quality of their decision-making by employing a variety of tactics. Experience is one of the things managers may utilize to improve decision-making. When it comes to building an effective and high-quality decision-making process, experience is crucial. In other words, more experienced managers or leaders have received more information and developed greater competency, allowing them to make better and more informed decisions (Marquis and Huston, 2009). Managers with more experience have superior problem-solving skills and know what additional information to seek out before making a choice. Another way managers may take to improve decision-making quality is to incorporate employees from various levels of the business, which eliminates unnecessary hierarchy and brings everyone on board.

Finally, In healthcare organizations, interprofessional teams play an important role in patient safety. They work together to provide the best possible care for patients while also promoting safety. Similarly, nurse managers must foster a healthy and safe work environment for healthcare providers, thereby improving patient outcomes and safety. To improve the decision-making process.

References

Marquis, B. L., & Huston, C. J. (2009). Leadership roles and management functions in nursing: Theory and application. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Stewart, K. R. (2016). SBAR, communication, and patient safety: An integrated literature review.

Quality Improvement In Healthcare: Annotated Bibliography Free Sample

Statement of Topic

Thompson et al.(2018) rightly observe that in a world where technological advances are at their peak, why quality improvement in healthcare systems remains below acceptable levels, almost to the point of causing death, should concern all stakeholders. Quality improvement frameworks employed in the healthcare field aim to standardize processes and structures to reduce variations and achieve a stable and predictable outcome for patients, healthcare systems, and the entire organization. However, many healthcare facilities still lose patients to preventable medical errors. It impedes addressing patient care needs, ensuring safety, and achieving desired outcomes. This paper will offer insight into the surge in human medication administration errors in healthcare that impedes achieving quality healthcare improvement. In particular, the paper will aim to provide an evidence-based practice that will address the sorry state of the practice and decrease medication administration errors to optimize healthcare outcomes.

Ho, J., & Burger, D. (2020). Improving medication safety practice at a community hospital: a focus on bar code medication administration scanning and pain reassessment. BMJ open quality9(3), e000987. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjoq-2020-000987

This article argues that over 30% of medical errors occur at the point of administration and identifies two key areas of opportunity for quality improvement: bedside bar-code medication administration and pain reassessment. I find it essential to address the topic as it agrees with the research topic that medical administration errors exist and have far-reaching consequences on quality. It exposes different points of quality breaches and strategies to address them. As the two scholars observe, “only 81% of medication are scanned before administration, creating room for potential errors that could further hurt the patient. The contributors, professor David Burger and Professor Jacqueline Ho have collectively contributed over 450 articles in the field and are active researchers in health sciences, therefore are credible, and their contributions are regarded in high esteem in this topic.

Thompson, K. M., Swanson, K. M., Cox, D. L., Kirchner, R. B., Russell, J. J., Wermers, R. A., Storlie, C. B., Johnson, M. G., & Naessens, J. M. (2018). Implementation of Bar-Code Medication Administration to Reduce Patient Harm. Mayo Clinic proceedings. Innovations, quality & outcomes2(4), 342–351. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocpiqo.2018.09.001

This article aims to reduce patient harm that arises from medical administration. It will help the research by assisting in assessing the impact of implementing bar-code medication administration technology as an initiative to eliminate medical errors during administration. As the contributors posit, “administration errors, such as giving wrong drug or wrong dose contribute to approximately 20% of the hospital medication errors. All the seven contributors are distinguished scholars with a minimum Ph.D. qualification and are authorities in the medical world. Christine Thompson, for example, is a correspondent in the department of emergency medicine at Mayo Clinic and a prolific contributor to reputable medical journals.

van der Sluijs, A. F., van Slobbe-Bijlsma, E. R., Goossens, A., Vlaar, A. P., & Dongelmans, D. A. (2019). Reducing errors in the administration of medication with infusion pumps in the intensive care department: A lean approach. SAGE open medicine7, 2050312118822629. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050312118822629

According to this article, medical errors remain crucial in improving healthcare quality and safety. I will use the article to establish the different administration errors to affirm the need to reduce them as part of quality improvement. The article posits that “administering medication using infusion pumps carries a range of risks that cause incidents affecting patient safety and increasing medication cost. The article also suggests different ways of lowering administration errors which will help inform the research. The contributors are renowned doctors with over two decades of experience in healthcare. Van der Sluijs, for example, is known for his numerous articles that aim to optimize patients’ safety.

Kirkendall, E., Huth, H., Rauenbuehler, B., Moses, A., Melton, K., & Ni, Y. (2020). The Generalizability of a Medication Administration Discrepancy Detection System: Quantitative Comparative Analysis. JMIR medical informatics8(12), e22031. https://doi.org/10.2196/22031

This article also reflects on the overwhelming proposition of medication errors that healthcare facilities register yearly by data. I will use it to foreground the research using data on the impact and the extent of medical errors in lowering healthcare safety and quality. It posits that “ technology adoption can be a helpful addition in healthcare to help identify errors in real-time, detect discrepancies and attempt to eliminate the errors. The contributors of the article are of great reputation in the medical field. Eric Kirkendall is an innovator in healthcare, currently serving as the director of Digital Health Innovation. His contribution to using technology to lower medical errors will help establish the gaps that still exist that lead to persistent errors.

Leahy, I. C., Lavoie, M., Zurakowski, D., Baier, A. W., & Brustowicz, R. M. (2018). Medication errors in a pediatric anesthesia setting: Incidence, etiologies, and error reduction strategies. Journal of clinical anesthesia49, 107–111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinane.2018.05.011

The article deals with medical errors during anesthetic medication to lower the frequency, type, and outcome. According to the authors, overdose, incorrect admission routes, and pump misuse are some of the sources of errors in anesthetic patients that lead to harm. Building on this knowledge will be essential in establishing an evidence-based practice to ensure that errors are minimized through measurable actions to increase quality. Professor Izabela C Leahy is a practicing nurse, a clinical administrator, and a healthcare leader whose reputation, integrity, credibility, and talent in guiding the healthcare field to success are immeasurable. The co-contributors are also men and women of high stature in the medical field whose assessment of the situation will offer insight to further the research objectives.

References

Ho, J., & Burger, D. (2020). Improving medication safety practice at a community hospital: a focus on bar code medication administration scanning and pain reassessment. BMJ open quality9(3), e000987. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjoq-2020-000987

Kirkendall, E., Huth, H., Rauenbuehler, B., Moses, A., Melton, K., & Ni, Y. (2020). The Generalizability of a Medication Administration Discrepancy Detection System: Quantitative Comparative Analysis. JMIR medical informatics8(12), e22031. https://doi.org/10.2196/22031

Leahy, I. C., Lavoie, M., Zurakowski, D., Baier, A. W., & Brustowicz, R. M. (2018). Medication errors in a pediatric anesthesia setting: Incidence, etiologies, and error reduction strategies. Journal of clinical anesthesia49, 107–111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinane.2018.05.011

Thompson, K. M., Swanson, K. M., Cox, D. L., Kirchner, R. B., Russell, J. J., Wermers, R. A., Storlie, C. B., Johnson, M. G., & Naessens, J. M. (2018). Implementation of Bar-Code Medication Administration to Reduce Patient Harm. Mayo Clinic proceedings. Innovations, quality & outcomes2(4), 342–351. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocpiqo.2018.09.001

van der Sluijs, A. F., van Slobbe-Bijlsma, E. R., Goossens, A., Vlaar, A. P., & Dongelmans, D. A. (2019). Reducing errors in the administration of medication with infusion pumps in the intensive care department: A lean approach. SAGE open medicine7, 2050312118822629. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050312118822629

Healthcare Managerial Position Sample College Essay

In order to meet the needs of a rapidly aging baby boomer generation, the healthcare industry is predicted to expand, creating numerous job opportunities for those who work in the healthcare field. As with other healthcare workers, the number one priority of healthcare managers is to assist others in getting well. The above trait proves why healthcare managers possess a keen business sense and solid communication abilities (Buchbinder, 2019). As a healthcare manager, one must be equally at ease working independently or as part of a group, as they will frequently be responsible for making crucial decisions and following the regulations and standards of their hospital or medical center.

Managers in the healthcare industry can assume jobs such as Health Care Analyst, Health Care Department Manager, and Dental Officer Manager. Employers seek healthcare professionals who are willing to undertake leadership roles. Employers also seek candidates with knowledge of the trends influencing the current healthcare market and the possible role of managed care, which is rapidly becoming the accepted practice for providing healthcare benefits. Managed care, l Leadership, and medical assisting are just a few of the specializations available to those interested in a career in healthcare management.

Before the emergence of fast-expanding medical technology, physicians required fewer healthcare managers. Nevertheless, the near-continuous advancements in medical technology (such as adjustments in healthcare data systems) and consistent modifications in healthcare-related regulations and laws necessitate that healthcare facilities and other medical centers employ specialists in these fields to ensure that everything operates as intended. This individual also serves as a spokesman when giving press information. The healthcare manager is also responsible for making decisions on performance assessments, planning, social media updates, and invoicing.

Like managers in virtually every profession, they are also responsible for scheduling care employees such as CNAs and nurses. Additionally, they ensure that patients get quality care. To achieve this, they might design patient care questionnaires and respond to any patient complaints. Communication, leadership, and problem-solving skills are all necessary to succeed as a manager. A healthcare manager must be able to strike a delicate balance between the above and medical knowledge in order to succeed. Managers in the healthcare industry must be able to oversee everyday operations, guide personnel, and safeguard patients’ best interests. Managerial tasks encompass a broad range of responsibilities that are supported by a number of advantageous personal qualities.

A healthcare manager must be a competent leader in order to be successful (Robbins & Davidhizar, 2020). Any manager’s primary responsibility is to establish team objectives and devise ways to attain them. The healthcare manager should also be a competent mentor and evaluator so that they may coach members of the team to improve their skills as their expertise advances. Additionally, healthcare managers must be members of the team. The healthcare manager must support the participation of other team members and foster a non-judgmental atmosphere in which individuals feel their thoughts are respected and are not scared to speak.

Additionally, healthcare managers must be able to inspire others. Keeping others on a road of personal and professional development is a crucial managerial goal. The manager’s discretion is to acknowledge employees who live up to expectations and celebrate their accomplishments.

To ensure that patients and associates receive the best possible care, a healthcare manager must be able to stay up with the latest technological advancements and trends in the sector. It might be difficult to maintain perspective on the broad picture and avoid becoming overwhelmed while juggling many projects. Managers of health care should be able to improve productivity by delegating to others and overseeing numerous staff and projects simultaneously. Besides, managers in the healthcare industry must be able to prioritize tasks and direct employees properly.

As healthcare is an ever-evolving field, healthcare managers must be ready to adapt to new objectives and modify processes accordingly. Identifying, understanding, and resolving problems as they arise can require inventiveness and quick thinking. Creating innovative ways to boost patient and associate satisfaction is a continual task, whether it is testing a new technique or designing a new promotional concept. It is also necessary to employ strategic planning to make sure that all operations and plans adhere to government and safety laws and avoid legal ramifications. As plans are executed, the manager’s responsibility is to solicit and gather feedback to modify plans and guarantee their success.

It might be difficult to keep track of everyone and everything in the workplace (Hwang & Cha, 2018). The manager must be able to navigate the corporate ship with composure and concentration. Healthcare managers should take the lead in representing the institution with integrity and honesty in public relations. As a role model for the rest of the team, a manager must uphold the highest standards of ethics and treat everyone with dignity.

References

Buchbinder, S. B., Shanks, N. H., & Kite, B. J. (2019). Introduction to health care management. Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Hwang, I., & Cha, O. (2018). Examining technostress creators and role stress as potential threats to employees’ information security compliance. Computers in Human Behavior81, 282-293.

Robbins, B., & Davidhizar, R. (2020). Transformational leadership in health care today. The Health Care Manager39(3), 117-121.