Long-Term Goals And Objectives In An Organization Essay Sample For College

Organizations’ Long-Term Goals and Objectives

Every organization or business has aspirations and future positions they want to occupy as compared with competitors. The future image is broken down into long-term goals and objectives, to which all business operations are aligned. According to the video “9 Startup Funding,” long-lasting objectives are performance goals of a business intended to be attained over a long period, mostly more than five years. They usually include the organization’s profitability, return on investment, employee relations, corporate image, technology leadership, and competitive positions, among others that are industry-specific.

A food processing company will be considered in its initial stages of development. Such an organization could have started small, serving the local market through retail shops or wholesales within a limited geographical coverage. During its first stages, a food processing firm focuses on short-term objectives, mostly for survival and growth, but it must have a bigger picture of the future. Their long-term goals would include becoming a global leader in food processing, attaining high profitability and opening other branches, and gaining leadership in technology by automating its operations and utilizing e-commerce. The company could also aim at becoming a socially responsible organization with outstanding ethical performance, have the best workforce and enhanced employee relations, and outcompete rivals through product differentiation.

Similarly, the long-term goals of a food processing company are immense and capital-intensive. First, it might seek to attain 5 million profits by the end of five years and to have 10000 million tons of sales annually for a couple of years. The firm could also reduce employee turnover by 5% yearly apart from engaging in various corporate social services for five years, according to “9 Startup Funding Options” (00:00:00-00:01:00). Finally, a food processing company should seek to enlarge its market share by a certain percentage as one of its long-term objectives.

Funds Needed to Achieve the Firm’s Long-Term Goals and Objectives

To achieve long-term objectives, each organizational activity requires enormous funds, including employee training costs and development, to reduce turnover, and improve employee relations. Marketing funds are also needed to attain a high market share and increase sales volume. The company requires funds for logistics, storage, and transportation of products, apart from that required for product differentiation to gain competitive advantage (“9 Startup Funding Options” 00:00:00-00:05:00). Resources for expansion and growth, technology (system and software installations and computers), physical development of the processing units, and general maintenance of the premises demand large funds. Finally, the organization requires establishing regional and international distribution centers and branding and packaging products for export.

Sources of Long-Term Funding (Capital) Available and the One’s Fitted Best Organizational Needs

There are nine significant sources of funding that can be used by the organization to achieve the long-term objectives and goals, and each has unique requirements. The “9 Startup Funding Options” (00:01:00-00:03:10) shows that banks lend money to organizations in the form of loans. For an organization to qualify for funding, it must have high net worth equity as collateral, a well-developed business plan, and a credit score above 700 (“9 Startup Funding Options” 00:00:40-00:00:50). However, funding by banks is difficult and slow and, therefore, not appropriate for an emergency. Banks also have Community advantage and microloan – they offer loans to small businesses amounting to $250.000 and $50.000, respectively (“9 Startup Funding Options” 00:01:30-00:02:15). An organization must have saved 30% of its earnings to qualify and possess managerial and industrial experience.

Additionally, rollover for business startups are sources of funds without penalties or interest, but a firm must have a minimum of $50.000 in their retirement account. Third, home equity loans and credit loans mean money is backed by homes and has the lowest interest rate, but owners must have 15% equity and a credit score over 620 (“9 Startup Funding Options” 00:02:20-00:02:30). Moreover, more flexible credit cards have cashbacks, and users are rewarded every time they use them. The fifth source includes microloans from nonprofit lenders, and to qualify, a company must have a cosigner and an independent source of income. Another funding option is a peer-to-peer loan provided online through investors willing to participate in the business depending on the organization’s financial status and credit score. Family and friends offer money, and, to ensure the trust is built, a business plan and a promissory note are required.

Further, Crowd Funding involves raising small amounts of money from many people through fundable, Kickstarter, and rocket hubs. It is favorable for businesses offering consumer goods – lastly, Angel investors, and venture capital – funding from wealthy individuals and other companies’ source income. To qualify, an organization must have a business plan, financial projections, return on investment of about ten times, and high internal control levels.

According to the food processing company’s objectives and goals, the right funding is bank loans because the purposes require large amounts of money, which banks can provide since other sources offer relatively lower parts. It is also appropriate because the company has five years to accomplish the objectives, and, therefore, the slow procedure in funding will not affect its operations. The organization will spend its first years establishing a good credit record, making collaterals, and then preparing a business plan.

Overall, an organization’s objectives are essential in guiding its operations and for financial planning. However, huge funds are required to achieve them, and most startup businesses do not have them. The options available for funding are disparate, including bank loans, borrowing from family members and friends, microloans from nonprofit lenders, and crowdfunding. Further, a company can consider using credit cards as they offer flexibility, cashback, and rewards. The right selection can help an organization to quickly achieve its goals.

Work Cited

“9 Startup Funding Options – Business Loans + More.” YouTube, uploaded by FitSmallBusiness, 2020. Web.

Resilience In Hill’s The Illegal, D’Angelo’s The Step Not Taken, The Wailers’ Get Up Stand Up

Common themes connect many seemingly unrelated works of art and literature. This is true for The Illegal by Lawrence Hill, The Step Not Taken by Paul D’Angelo, and the song Get Up Stand Up by The Wailers. Although they revolve around entirely different stories, the two works of literature and Bob Marley’s song examine the same topic. This essay will argue that the selected works exemplify resilience through the notion of defying circumstances.

The idea of resilience in the selected works is developed through the illustration of the necessity of strength and endurance for one’s survival. Resilience can be defined as “an ability to recover from or adjust easily to misfortune or change” (Merriam-Webster). If for Viola Hill from The Illegal, resilience means being professional, for D’Angelo’s character, it is about having the strength to do “the right thing. The human thing” (D’Angelo 1). Overall, the actions and convictions of the heroes in these works show different meanings of resilience in the modern world.

The works selected for the essay illustrate the characters’ resilience, or its absence, through various situations. The strength of Hill’s protagonist, Keita, is not the same one D’Angelo’s unnamed narrator failed to show to the stranger in the elevator. It is also not the same power and resistance The Wailers’ song tries to arouse in listeners when Bob Marley sings the words “Don’t give up the fight” (The Wailers). However, all types of resilience are important as they help survive people overcome the most adverse circumstances.

Hill focuses on depicting the strive and resilience through the immigrant experience. The main hero, Keita, is an illegal immigrant in the fictional country Freedom State, where the government tries to deport all the refugees living within its borders. As an undocumented migrant, Keita lives in constant fear of deportation, while his sister’s life depends on him winning underground races. The escape to the new country should have been his escape from danger, but Keita found himself in a more precarious situation. In both countries, Keita focuses on running as a means of survival, telling himself, “Run, Keita. Just run” (Hill 15). It is his resilience that helps him overcome his circumstances.

In his song, Marley invokes the listeners to rebel against adversity and fight for their rights. The song has a clear religious subtext, evoking people to fight for freedom to follow the religion they choose. In the second verse, Marley sings, “But if you know what life is worth, You will look for yours on earth” (The Wailers). These words provoke listeners not to wait for a paradise that may not come but to fight for their life while they have the chance. This song can be chosen as an anthem for any cause. It shows that resilience also means active actions against one’s oppressors, not only perseverance.

Hill also develops the concept of resilience in everyday experiences through the character of Viola Hill, a journalist investigating the government of the Freedom State. Throughout the novel, her resilience is shown through her commitment to her job and her unwavering professionalism. Viola does not even take sick leaves to ensure she receives the best assignments, as she “didn’t want people thinking she’d keel over and die” (Hill 113). Through this character, the readers can see that one needs to be flexible and resilient to succeed in everyday life.

Resilience can also be seen in how characters help others in unfortunate circumstances. In The Step Not Taken, D’Angelo depicts a character who is too embarrassed to ask a crying man in the elevator if he needs help. The protagonist believes he did the wrong thing and wants to find that person again to tell him “I was wrong, dreadfully wrong, not to step forward in his time of need” (D’Angelo 2). Overall, the short story shows that resilience can help adjust to the socially uncomfortable situation to help others, not just yourself.

In all the selected works, resilience is instrumental to survival. Keita would not survive as an illegal immigrant in the Freedom State if he were not resilient. In his case, giving up would mean a life of persecution back in Zantoroland. Similarly, freedom of religious expression and the ability to adjust to uncomfortable social situations are essential for the survival of civilized society. The theme of doing the right thing in both stories, with D’Angelo’s protagonist thinking, “I should have thrown caution to the winds and done the right thing” (D’Angelo 1). It is the resilience of every character in the face of their unique circumstances that allows them to do the right thing and survive.

Overall, the selected works show that resilience leads to personal growth. Keita’s experience of living as an undocumented refugee and participating in illegal races made him a better person. The absence of strength shown by D’Angelo’s nameless narrator in the elevator makes him realize its importance. He reflects on the experiences as a disgraceful one, stating, “and what I did next still shames me” (D’Angelo 1). It can be argued that he will never make this mistake again, and this error made him a more compassionate person.

In summary, the stories The Illegal by Lawrence Hill and The Step Not Taken by Paul D’Angelo, and the song Get Up Stand Up by The Wailers are united by the topic of resilience. The authors of these works illustrate the importance of being resilient in difficult times and everyday situations to survive in modern society. Overall, the selected works exemplify resilience through the notion of defying circumstances.

Essay Outline

Paragraph # Paragraph Title Paragraph Topic with Examples Teacher Initials
1. Defying Circumstances The selected works exemplify resilience through the notion of defying circumstances.
2. What is Resilience? The idea of resilience in the selected works is developed through the illustration of the necessity of endurance and perseverance for one’s survival.

“The right

thing. The human thing” (D’Angelo 1).

3. Different Types of Resilience These works illustrate the characters’ resilience, or its absence, through various situations and show when an adjustment to adversity is needed.

“Don’t give up the fight” (The Wailers).

4. Resilience in the Immigrant Experience Lawrence Hill focuses on depicting the strive and resilience through the immigrant experience.

Run, Keita. Just run. (Hill 15).

5. Resilience in the Face of Adversity In his song, Bob Marley invokes the listeners to rebel against adversity and fight for their rights.

“But if you know what life is worth,

You will look for yours on earth” (The Wailers).

6. Perseverance in Everyday Life Hill also develops the concept of resilience in everyday experiences through the character of Viola Hill.

“She didn’t want people thinking she’d keel over and die” (Hill 113).

7. Resilience in Helping Others Resilience can be seen in how characters help others in unfortunate circumstances.

“That I was

wrong, dreadfully wrong, not to step forward

in his time of need” (D’Angelo 2).

8. Resilience as the Instrument of Survival In all the selected works, resilience is instrumental to survival.

“I should have

thrown caution to the winds and done the

right thing” (D’Angelo 1).

9. Growth through Strength Overall, the selected works show that resilience leads to personal growth.

“And what I did next still shames me” (D’Angelo 1).

10. Overcoming Yourself Overall, the selected works exemplify resilience through the notion of defying circumstances.

Works Cited

D’Angelo, Paul. The Step Not Taken. The Ontario Educational Communications Authority, 2018.

Hill, Lawrence. The Illegal: A Novel. W.W. Norton & Company, 2016.

Merriam-Webster. “Definition of Resilience.” Merriam-Webster: America’s Most-trusted Online Dictionary. Web.

The Wailers. “Get Up, Stand Up.” Burnin’, 1973.

Austen’s “Pride And Prejudice”: Significance Of Letters

Introduction

Pride and Prejudice is a passionate epistolary novel written by Jane Austen in 1813. Letters are an important part of this novel as they are used to tell the story, develop the characters and build the exposition of themes. Correspondence was a common way of communication during that era. Based on this fact, Jane Austen draws the reader’s attention to characterization, themes, and stylistic devices and used them to develop the plot. This essay delves into the role, purpose, and significance of letters in the novel. The paper also focuses on the literary techniques evident in the letters to declare the writer’s intention to the audience.

Main body

Correspondence is the main literary approach that the author uses in this novel by having the characters continually written to one another. It can be noted that there were letters written by Mr. Collins, Elizabeth Bennett, Mr. Darcy, Jane, and Lydia, all of which reveal details about the personality traits of people within the society. Austen adopted this technique and naturally wove her series of letters into a dialogue and description of events. For instance, the written narrations become instrumental in shaping and describing crisis points in the novel (Devine 10). Through the letters by Elizabeth and Darcy, the writer exposes the flaws and strengths of her characters.

Moreover, Austen uses this opportunity to portray the gaps in the social standing and education of different characters in this particular work of art and further reveal their traits. According to Devine the significance of the letter is brought out when it becomes possible for the reader to relate with the character and learn about the other’s age, personality, social status, and feelings (14). This literary method enhances an individual’s ability to communicate contrary to the societal norms at the time when women were not expected to speak much about their feelings.

Characterization is revealed through the use of several letters in the novel. For instance, two letters by Mr. Collins, both addressed to Mr. Bennett, revealed more of his traits. The first letter is a masterpiece that reveals his personality and what to expect in the plot as it is noted that Mr. Collins is a proud man and holds his associates in high esteem. This is evident from his guidance on how Lady Catherine de Bourgh should be handled by Mr. Bennett when she arrives.

This develops the plot of the novel as it gives a glimpse of what to expect when Lady Catherine arrives (Sullivan 105). He proposes to Elizabeth to marry him and she refuses. This also presents a stylistic device – situational irony as portrayed in the novel as the characters’ search for love. Wan says, “It is a novel that explores the difficulties for unwedded women seeking a husband (349).” For example, Mr. Collins’ offer to Elizabeth is turned down, and he opts to propose to Miss Lucas, Elizabeth’s very close friend. This also contributes to the development of the novel’s characters.

The novel is written at a time when social status, wealth, and education take center stage in all the formations within this society. Marriage is proposed with this in mind; one marries focusing on the wealth and status they will enjoy because of such a union. In her letters, Elizabeth makes it known that she believes in love but not wealth and fame. Wan expresses that Austen reveals her ideal marriage by using the different love stories through Pride and Prejudice.

For instance, the marriage between Elizabeth and Darcy proves a need for individuals to accommodate each other’s personalities and traits for a better marriage to exist ((349-350). The letters have been instrumental in proving that love and marriage do not solely depend on social status and wealth but rather Austen’s main point, which is marriages are built on respect, understanding, and mutual love.

Austen satirizes the social behavior towards money, which was, in those times, a major preoccupation. People are judged based on their fortune and social status, as illustrated by Mrs. Bennet. Certainly, if Mr. Bennet died, the Bennet girls would be left with nothing since when there is no male inheritor all the family’s possessions are given to a male cousin. This threat is what makes Mrs. Bennet obsessed with her daughters marrying wealthy men. For her, happiness is measured only in terms of money. This also explains why Mr. Collins is surprised at Elizabeth’s refusal of his proposal.

Epistles in this novel are used to inform one character of the other’s inner self. It is noted, “When they were gone, Elizabeth, as if intending to exasperate herself as much as possible against Mr. Darcy, chose for her employment the examination of all the letters which Jane had written to her since her being in Kent” (Austen 177). Elizabeth takes it upon herself to examine all the letters Jane had written to her to gain an insight into Jane’s life. She believes that Charles Bingley is frustrating and mistreating her sister, which may cause her unhappiness. In exploring the letters, more is revealed to the readers about the problems being faced by Jane. Elizabeth discovers through the narrations that Jane is suffering, and this is also the device that the author uses to make the readers feel the misery and pain the two sisters are enduring.

Conclusion

In conclusion, in the novel Pride and Prejudice, Austen illustrates her ability to use the benefits of the epistolary genre through letters passed between the characters: when Darcy wrote his letter, he changed the views of the readers about his personality. For Elizabeth, through the prism of letters, he changes from a proud man to one who is truthful and protective. Letters appear only at points where they seem a natural means of communication between the characters, at moments of separation, whether physical or emotional. The letters seem to give a clear and detailed exposition and reveal the characters of the novel.

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. Book On Demand Ltd, 2017. Print.

Devine, Jodi A. Epistolary Revelations: Reading Letters in Nineteenth-Century British Novels. University of Delaware, 2007.

Sullivan, Gavin Brent, ed. Understanding Collective Pride and Group Identity: New Directions in Emotion Theory, Research and Practice. Routledge, 2014.

Wan, Yongkun. “Study on Jane Austin’s Original Views toward Marriage in Pride and Prejudice.” 2019, Francis Academic Press. Web.

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