Mental Status Examination Sample Assignment

Brief introduction and history

In nursing, nurses use different methods to obtain information from the patient to diagnose, such as physical assessment, review of systems, and history of the patients. On the other hand, psychiatrists use the Mental Status Examination (MSE) to assess the mental status of patients with mental disorders. In most cases, mental status examination explains the patient’s current state when the interview or the evaluation is being conducted. Adolf Meyer developed mental status examination in 1918 to set a standard outline to be used to assess the patient mental health status for the health professionals to avoid confusion in diagnosis (Voss RM, 2021). For the health professionals to obtain patient data, they combine passive observation and direct questioning of the patients to determine their mental status exam. The information of the data is to allow the health team or the interview to make mental health diagnoses and monitor the signs and symptoms. The mental status examination tool has different components, and each component describes or assesses a specific part of the mental function to obtain the subjective and objective assessment data. Other practitioners may organize the mental status examination tool differently, but they will collect information from the same area of focus. The tool is divided into broad categories: appearance, behavior, thinking disorders, perception disorders, mood and affect, judgment, insight, cognition, and vegetative symptoms (Liu et al., 2020). The broad categories are then subdivided into sections to allow adequate access to patient information for appropriate diagnosis and monitoring of the patients.

Population and why I select the assessment

In health care, mental status examination assessment tool is used by different healthcare professionals to obtain the current state of the patient’s mental state. For instance, nurses in the wards can use the mental status exam tool to assess the patient’s mental status. Together with the application of other assessment tools like the physical exam, a review of systems and the patient’s history can be used together with the mental status exam tool to provide actual problems that help give appropriate nursing intervention. However, the mental status exam is much more appropriate to be used by the health care professionals who are taking care or working in veteran facilities (Fu et al., 2021). Working with the veterans in the VA medical center is an excellent opportunity to use the assessment ideally, and it can help assist the veterans in need. I choose the mental examination assessment toll because most veterans go to war, and from their experiences, they have post-traumatic stress disorder that causes cognition impairment (Voss RM, 2021). This is because the veterans are passing through threatening, and the war is catastrophic, which causes mental disturbances, thus causing impairment of attention and memory. Because of the memory and attention impairment among the veterans, it will be instrumental for me to use the mental status examination assessment on the veterans since this will allow a proper assessment of the veterans and identify the clients’ needs. The tool will help me as a healthcare professional make the mental diagnosis and give the appropriate treatment and interventions that can help the veterans come out from their mental health problems.

The mental status examination has different categories or components that can be organized differently by the health care professionals. When dealing with the veterans, I can start with an appearance that describes the client’s general appearance. It entails the client’s grooming, hygiene, nutritional status, and prominent scars. This entails how the patient looks when conducting the assessment or observing the client. These observations are made within the first few seconds when the client interacts with the interviewer, while some are obtained throughout the interview process (Liu et al., 2020). After I check if the client looks older or younger than their actual age, I will also assess whether the client has any development delay and if the client is dressed inappropriately. From my observation, when the patient looks much older than the stated age, the client may be undergoing a severe medical condition. This may be due to either drug or substance abuse or the patient’s poorly controlled mental health illness. The client’s dressing or grooming and hygiene will tell the patient level of functioning(Voss RM, 2021). If the patient’s grooming and hygiene status are poor, the patient level of function is poor. This can be due to depression, negative symptoms of psychosis disorder, and neurocognitive disorder. The importance of scars and tattoos observation will help identify the client’s personality, behaviors, and personal history to help make a diagnosis. And to maintain a continuous conversation, the health practitioner must maintain trust between them and help clarify issues from the patient.

I will move to assess the patient’s behavior and movement. This entails how the patient acts during the interview. It is the role of the interviewer to identify whether the client is distressed or not, and the patient may feel distressed because of the underlying medical conditions that are causing the discomfort. It may mean the patient was brought into the clinic without their permission. The patient may also be paranoid, and when the hallucinations are severe, it can also cause a particular client to have discomfort. Behavior also entails the description of the interaction, whether the patient is corporative or non-corporative (Liu et al., 2020). I will also assess if the client’s behavior is congruent with the situation. If the other involuntary officers bring the client, I should not expect the client to be happy and smiling. I will assess if the patient can maintain eye contact and patient attitude toward me when conducting the interview. I will also check the movement, which describes how the patient is moving and what kind of movement the patient makes.

Assessment of motor activity is helpful to determine whether the client has any neurological and mental disorders(Voss RM, 2021). Moreover, I will include the posture and mannerisms of the client. Gait and posture will assess whether the patient is walking in an upright posture and steady, and any abnormal movements can lead to bradykinesia. The next step is to assess the speech that was evaluated passively when conducting the interview. The speech assessment will be described in rate, tone, rhythm, fluency, verbalization, and volume. I will assess the amount of speech the patient is speaking since it can signal the patient is suffering from anxiety or mood disorders when it is lower than usual. The speech is classified as either pressured, delayed, or slurred speech. Pressured client’s speech indicates that the patient suffers from a neurocognitive disorder.

The mood is the subjective description. This means the patient is to report how he is feeling at that moment. I will ask the patient to describe how they feel at this step. I will describe the mood using the quotation of how the patient states. The effect is the accurate description observed expression of the non-verbal language. The terms used to describe affect are restricted, elated, blunted, happy, sad, labile, agitated, euthymic, and flat. The mood and affect must be congruent with each other. The next step is to assess the thinking disorders. Thinking disorders include the thought process and thought content. The thought process is the expression of how the patient organizes thoughts. When the patient’s thought process is normal, it is goal-directed. The thought content is also the patient’s subject matter (Voss RM, 2021). So to assess the thought content, I will be listening to what the patient is saying and continuously questioning the client. So in thought content, I will assess the suicidal ideations, compulsions, delusions, phobias, and obsessions.

I will move to a perception that describes different types of illusion and hallucinations. I will assess the five different type’s hallucinations, tactile, gustatory, auditory, visual, and olfactory hallucinations. Usually, hallucination is the perception of something without an external stimulus, while illusion is the misperception of objects. I will then further assess cognition which consists of different branches; abstract reasoning, memory, orientation, concentration, and alertness (Fu et al., 2021). I will check the memory’s recent, immediate, and recall memory retention. The orientation is also divided into person, place, and time. I will assess abstract reasoning by asking the patient what he will do if given a particular object. Concentration will be assessed by using serial seven or serial three to assess the calculation ability of the patient. The final steps are insight, judgment, and vegetative symptoms(Voss RM, 2021). Insight is the patient’s awareness of being sick and within the facility. I will ask the patient whether he is aware of the place and why he is in the facility. Judgment is the ability of the patient to make a critical decision. I will also give the patient a scenario and expect a given an answer. A vegetative symptom includes the patient libido, sleep pattern, and appetite.

Summary of the findings

For the appearance, the patient may be addressed appropriately with the site, no odor, well-nourished, and no scars and tattoos. Behavior and movement; can be reported as upright and steady gait, no mannerisms and tics. The behavior can also be reported as calm and corporative and maintaining eye contact. Mood and affect; the mood is either euthymic, sad, or happy, while affect is blunted, elated, labile, and flat. Though the process can be retarded thought process, tangentially, circumstantiality, and flights of ideas, thought content is whether the patient denies any suicidal ideations, phobias, compulsions, obsessions, and delusions(Voss RM, 2021). Perception includes hallucination, and illusion can be poor or good, while judgment and insight might be poor or sound, and cognition also can be excellent or poor.

How it informs my clinical practice

The application of the mental status examination, when used together with other tools such as obtaining patient history, physical examination, review of systems, and laboratory test, can promote holistic care to the patient. When working with the patient, I would put it as a culture and include the MSE as part of the patient’s history. This is because mental status examination helps the health care team detect any psychiatric signs and symptoms. The assessment is also helpful in my clinical practice since it allows the health team to diagnose mental illness. It also allows me to identify the underlying condition of the problem and determine the patient’s levels of severity of the illness(Voss RM, 2021). Therefore I support that all healthcare teams should be trained on the use of mental status examination to be equipped with the skills to observe and monitor the patient progress of treatment.

References

Fu, X., Yu, W., Ke, M., Wang, X., Zhang, J., Luo, T., Massman, P. J., Doody, R. S., & Lü, Y. (2021). Chinese Version of the Baylor Profound Mental Status Examination: A Brief Staging Measure for Severe Alzheimer’s Disease Patients. The Journal of Alzheimer’s disease prevention, 8(2), 175–180. https://doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2020.72.

Liu, I. T., Lee, W. J., Lin, S. Y., Chang, S. T., Kao, C. L., & Cheng, Y. Y. (2020). Therapeutic Effects of Exercise Training on Elderly Patients With Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation101(5), 762–769. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2020.01.012

Voss RM, M Das J. Mental Status Examination. [Updated 2021 Sep 16]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK546682/

Mentally Ill Offenders Paper Essay Example

The last ten years have been the worst in the US regarding mass shootings, and they have elicited debates regarding the connection between criminality and mental illness. The renewed media attention and focus on the significance of mental health after the deadly mass shootings is a positive development; the relationship between criminality and mental illness is conflated. The masses believe that mentally ill individuals are more likely to commit acts of aggression and violence, and this perception has been cultivated by the portrayals of criminals in the media as crazy people. But data from research suggests otherwise as mentally ill people are more likely to be victims of violent crime instead of perpetrators. It is a form of implicit bias that extends to all aspects of life, such as the criminal justice system, which points to the need for a deeper analysis of criminality and psychiatric illness.

Crime is never evidence of a mental disorder but a misconception that all criminals are sick, mainly those that commit serious or senseless crimes like murder. The facets governing mental illness and crime should be kept distinct. Crime is regarded as the violation of laws of the land, while mental disorder refers to any behavior marked by some degree of lack of the general capacity for rationality or accompanying dysfunction. The behavior elicited by mentally ill individuals might be criminal or not, and they may be legally responsible or not for the behavior that the mental disorder produces. On the other hand, criminal behavior is highly rational, differentiating it from mentally ill individuals. The distinction does not mean that mentally ill people are innocent; it demonstrates that some crimes result from mental disorders, but considering all crimes as a manifestation of the disorder beats logic (Markowitz, 2011). It fails to consider all the sensible boundaries to the idea of mental disorder and enhances commonly acknowledged notions regarding accountability and morality. These biases have blocked any efforts to conduct research and estimate the criminal behavior of individuals with mental illness. It is estimated that people who abuse drugs and alcohol are more likely to commit crimes than mentally ill individuals, but these crimes are still blamed on mental illness.

Society views behaviors and conduct problems as symptoms of a psychological disorder, and the perception is evident in the criminal justice system whereby the high incidences of mental illnesses have resulted from false labeling of criminals of suffering from a disorder. The figures collected from the prisons are not based on psychiatric evaluations but based on social factors. One of the disorders found in prisons is Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), and it is used to paint offenders as victims of mental illness (Ghiasi et al., 2020). The common symptoms for ASPD are primarily consistent and serious antisocial behaviors, but they do not include affective or cognitive psychopathology. The diagnostic criteria mean that the condition will be found in many offenders, but it does not offer a sound basis per se to consider it a disorder. It ignores vital information that shows that a prison environment is very stressful, especially in ways that might make an individual to develop mental disorders. Incarcerated offenders lack the normal range of stimuli ranging from social support, love, sexual relationships, and they are distanced from their familial environment, while the worst is the constant fear for their life. The offender’s experiences are similar to patients suffering from depression, whereby they pull away from other people primarily because of mental stresses, but these episodes are not extreme (Shipley &Tempelmeyer, 2012).

The misdiagnosis of offenders with disorders does not eliminate the fact that there is a massive group of offenders whose conditions increase the risk of committing a crime. When patients with mental illnesses fail to take their treatment, they are more likely to experience illusions or have long-lasting paranoia. It means that patients suffering from the diseases must take their medication to reduce the likelihood of committing a crime in the community or engaging in aggressive behavior in prisons. According to Ghiasi et al. (2020), drug use is closely associated with criminal behavior compared to mental disorders. People who abuse drugs with or without mental illnesses are more likely to become criminals. However, individuals with mental illness have a higher likelihood of abusing drugs and alcohol than those without mental disorders. Evidence shows that drug use accounts for most criminal cases, but criminal behavior might be more prevalent among individuals with mental illness because they are more likely to abuse drugs. The issue is worse for individuals who have personality disorders, whereby they are at a greater risk of criminal behavior if they were to use illegal drugs. It shows that mentally ill people are less likely to be offenders without drugs, which is a significant factor that the justice system should consider.

In conclusion, an analysis of mentally ill offenders proves that they are misjudged by society as criminals while they are victims, but the abuse of drugs has shown that mentally ill abusers are more likely to commit crimes. The perception that most of the offenders are mentally ill is wrong, and the criteria used to measure mental disorders in prisons are flawed as they do not disregard the psychological aspects and the environment, which has a massive effect on their mental capacity. But the abuse of drugs is common among mentally ill individuals is higher than ordinary people and due to the relationship between drugs and crime, more mentally ill are more likely to be arrested as criminals. The finding is excellent, but it does not mean that all substance use crimes involve mentally ill people.

References

Ghiasi, N., Azhar, Y., & Singh, J. (2020). Psychiatric illness and criminality. StatPearls.

Markowitz, F. E. (2011). Mental illness, crime, and violence: Risk, context, and social control. Aggression and violent behavior, 16(1), 36-44.

Shipley, S. L., & Tempelmeyer, T. C. (2012). Reflections on homelessness, mental illness, and crime. Journal of forensic psychology practice, 12(5), 409-423.

German Auto-Industry And Mercedes-Benz Free Essay

Introduction

Germany is best known for its production of the solid machine. The world market has learned to appreciate and acknowledge most of the German machines for their durability and the ability to sustain the shelf life in the market. Carl Benz and Gottlieb Daimler being the fathers of Mercedes, brought to life the Mercedes Benz automobile, a gasoline automobile, in the year 1926 [1][2]. Gottlieb Daimler first built the motorcycle version and later shifted to the automobile version of Mercedes Benz. Mercedes Benz has continued to be a global brand by retaining its class and luxurious automobiles legacy by improving its innovation, styling, safety, and performance. The company came from humble beginnings, and it has managed to come up as one of the best automobile brands across the globe. The vision for building up the Benz industry was to produce the world’s first gasoline-powered car.

German Auto-industry before National Socialism

In 1937 Daimler-Benz increased the production of the mobilization objects such as the LG 3000 trucks, then the plane engines such as the Db 600 and Db 601 [3]. To increase the production volume for the airplane engines, a new construction site was set up in Genshagen, a well-covered forest located in the south of Berlin, in 1936, which was before WW2[4]. During this period, the company majored in production trucks during the amid of World War II. Production of spare parts and military vehicle repairs was growing steadily. Demand for labor to handle the increased production was highly needed; unfortunately, arms production was greatly needed since most workers were fighting at the forefront of the war.

Initially, the labor force focused on employing women to cater to the required number of men on the battlefield. The war was so intense that the majority of the men were taken to the war front to defend the interests of the nation[5].

Creation of Mercedes-Benz

Having the urge to build the first gasoline automobile machine in 1886, Carl Benz patented the first gasoline-powered car[6]. After several years of endless fights with wobbly corporate associates and hindrances from bank protocols, Karl Benz started Benz &Co Rheinische Gasmotoren-Fabrik in 1883[7]. His company was one of the primary two builders established in Germany. The wife of Carl Benz Bertha was very active in most of his business ventures. The wife to Carl led to the promotion of Motorwagen by driving it on a 120-mile journey. She acted as her mechanic during the long journey. During this time, Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach collaborated on their engines, which would later be the power set for the Daimler Reitwagen motorcoach. Having invented a combustion engine in 1885, the two followed a successful attachment to a motorcycle, a boat, and a stage wagon coach[8]. The engine was much more effective and took a smaller space than its predecessors. Despite the accomplishment, Daimler and Maybach reconciled their business partnership after facing challenges with the company’s investors and later took back the organization in 1894. Gottlieb died in the late 1900s and left Maybach to run the company.

The motorcoach engine production led to the development of the world’s first truck in 1896 and the first Mercedes in 1901[9]. The two companies formed by the three merged in 1926 and became the Daimler-Benz AG. The merging of these two companies gave the firm the power to market, conduct production, sales, and design as a unit. During the motor show of 1926 in Berlin, the brand of Mercedes-Benz passenger cars was unveiled[10][11]. The company has enhanced and promoted the level of innovation since from the 1930s to today by improving the level of performance safety and the progress in the suspension systems.

Mercedes During WW2

The company Daimler-Benz used unpaid and forced labor to cater to its wartime engine manufacturing and the production of military vehicles. Many laborers lost their lives due to ill-treatment, while Nazi soldiers murdered some. The increased production demand saw Daimler-Benz hire women to work in the firms as the majority of the men were busy in the war. Since the women could not keep up with the production demand, this is where Daimler-Benz decided to use compulsory work hands from western Europe. These employees comprised POWs (detainees of war) initially captured and ferried away from the war front line and the citizens who had been kidnapped from different townships and communities[12]. The company also secondhanded the detainees in absorption camps as their forced labor force. Surprisingly the company did not deny at any given point that it was treating the workers working in their firms in a very inhuman manner. These prisoners stayed in concentration camps and were housed in barracks within the company’s premises. By this time, Germany had approved the Geneva Convention in 1929 and accepted to treat the prisoners in a much more human manner[13]. This kind of treatment was mainly reserved for allied prisoners of war. Laborers taken to the concentration camps were supervised in Daimler-Benz facilities and later exchanged to Daimler-Benz for money. Later, when the war ended, the company never hid its links with the Nazis federation together with the prison concentration camps. Still, it aggressively got intricate in the commemoration of the war events, responsibilities are given, and the prospects for the German automobile industry.

The demand for durable military vehicles was very high, and the company was running short of funds to cater to the growing labor force. Like other many German firms, during the reign of Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich, the company Daimler-Benz used forced labor to facilitate its wartime production of engines and military vehicles. Many laborers died from ill-treatment while the Nazi soldiers killed others in the concentration camps. Adolf Hitler co-opted Mercedes-Benz like other German society automakers together with the Nazi party[14]. After the first World War, the company in the production of gasoline automobiles, Mercedes Benz, was hijacked by the political movements associated with Adolf Hitler. These movements exploited the company’s superiority in engineering and industrial production. The Nazi regime took advantage of the company’s existence for its ruthless and hostile plans. During this period, the Nazis focused on several automobile makers produced locally during the troubled times of World War Two[15]. The fascistic eagerness that led to the rise of World War two got so much attention from social media groups. Many pictures of Adolf Hitler saluting the Nazi army while he was on top of a Mercedes-Benz automobile provided a great glimpse of the state of the art[16]. During this time, the advertisement of the Mercedes-Benz engineering fineness and political disfunction incredibly existed. The use of Mercedes-Benz by Adolf Hitler gave the public a great sense to purchase and use automobiles.

Due to the demand for reliable and durable vehicles during the War, Mercedes-Benz built theG3a and the G4, 6*4 all-terrain vehicles. The cars were propelled by an inline six-cylinder or a V-8-cylinder motor. The engines provided enough power to drive the machines in different terrains. The company also built L3000 types A and S, which were approximately three-ton trucks powered by a 75hp with 4849cc capacity of four-cylinder[17]. Daimler-Benz company focusing on truck production, manufactured over 8000 trucks. The heaviest trucks manufactured were the Type L6500 4*2 trucks manufactured by Mercedes-Benz from 1938 to 1940 weighed 6.5 tons. The vehicles had two rear-wheeled-drive axles for maximum propulsion[18].

At the start of the second world war, most privately owned cars with above 1000 CC and rear-wheel drive were impounded by the Nazis. The Mercedes-Benz cars and trucks were considered in this category as well. The Nazi army seized the Mercedes vehicles and made them staff cars for the Nazi party regime. Wehrmacht impounded the Mercedes-Benz omnibuses and used them as troop transporters and lab vehicles[19].

Post War Reconstruction

The valuation of the damage that occurred during the war in 1945 was off-putting to the company[20]. In conjunction with the Potsdam Agreement, all German possessions overseas remained seized and castoff for compensations expenses. Daimler-Benz lost all external holdings, partners, divisions, and comprehensive resources in the Soviet Union areas. The global system previously existed was demolished, and the firm had to begin rebuilding its grounds. Daimler Benz had to abandon unsettled privileges in contrast to the state.

In 1945 the company was demoted to the four southern German production plants which were; Unterturkheim, Seindelfingen, Mannheim and Gaggenau including the Berlin-Marienfelde. Daimler-Benz returned to its original position before the National Socialists came to power[21]. The Unterturkheim plat acted as the service and repair bay for the US military vehicles. The denazification of the German army’s top officials led to vital changes in the composition of the Board of Directors.

After numerous efforts were carried out, the firm got a ne production permit from the American authorities occupying the area on 3rd January 1946[22]. Despite the harsh conditions and situations, the firm was able to go back on its feet by the currency reformation in 1948.

By 1947, production had resumed in most of the plants in Germany[23]. The Mannheim and Gaggenau plants opposed picking the war thread time on truck production. In the states of Sindelfingen and Unterturkheim, the show had to be brought to life by rebuilding the firm’s production systems. After the war, immediate action in the production line was to manufacture passenger cars and commercial vehicles. Returning to the racing grounds was not a priority for the company as they considered it a gradual process that was not so vital at that particular moment in time. After the war, the engineers focused on repairing ordinary passenger cars for the first few years.

The company’s return to motor racing show events was in September 1950, when Karl Kling joined the ADAC six-hour race for sports and tourist cars using the Mercedes-Benz 170 S within the Nürburgring environment[24]. The racing inauguration for the company after the war was a significant boost for the company’s new era in production. In1951, the first new post-war passenger car was launched, the 220 (W187) and 300 (W 186). The 300 series became the company’s core motorsport car for the firm, which saw great success over the next few years.

Daimler-Benz management announced their plans to engage in motorsports in June 1951, focusing on racing and producing sports cars[25]. When the introduction of Formula 1 was inaugurated, the Grand Prix vehicles had to wait until 1954 for further commissioning. Mercedes-Benz launched the 300SL series as their first new racing car. The primary enhancements in this model were the multiple six-cylinder inline engines that comprised three Solex down-draught carburetors and an acute camshaft angle that boosted the output to129kW at 5200revolutions per minute[26].

Foreign expansion

After the company’s rebuilding, the growth of the sales revenues grew at a tremendous rate creating new records. This growth rate was cultivated not only by domestic sales but also by the exports to foreign customers such as in the US. In 1948 when the German currency was restructured, the economy enjoyed a low inflation rate that led to a higher industrial growth rate[27][28]. During this particular moment, a money change was converted from the Reichsmark to the Deutsche mark. This historical date was named the German Monetary Wonder or the Wirtschaftswunder. At this time, Daimler-Benz excelled so well in the company’s overall sales. During this time, the number of sales units acted as a symbol of the German Economic Miracle.

Till the 1950s, Daimler Benz relied on independent sales distributors worldwide to distribute on its behalf. This whole process proved to be so risky and ineffective in so many areas, such as the level of integrity. As a result, Daimler-Benz decided to expand its sales network to other regions. The company first expanded its grids in Europe, and by 1955 Daimler-Benz had already built up 178 general distributors across the globe[29]. Daimler-Benz had a lot of its global set-up in the post-war era. Still, the ages of financial development facilitated the firm to come back on its feet and reclaim its global automotive dealer market space. Daimler-Benz grabbed the excellent opportunity to expand its production centers to the worldwide market. The company took advantage of the cheap production costs by shifting to other countries. Still, some governments required local production facilities to be set up before they could grant international licenses to import. This requirement led to the extensive and rapid global expansion of the production facilities. Initial plants were opened in Brazil, Argentina, and India. These administrations needed to utilize the home-grown possessions first before they could grant permission to import. The countries created new opportunities for their people through job creation and enlargement of their automobile market view. Later on, global expansion was carried out to Iran, Turkey, and South Africa.

The company managed to penetrate the American market, thus; leading to the company’s global success. In North America, Daimler-Benz established a plant in 1955[30]. He had begun to labor with Max Hoffman, an Australian luxury car shipper based in New York by this time. Hoffman recommended the first purchase of the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gull Wing to his American traders to distribute crosswise the nation. The market value and returns rose to 80% due to the widespread nature of the car[31]. The 300SL turns out to be the first Mercedes-Benz to flourish in the global marketplace. The success was a significant boost to the company’s global market view.

The presence of motorsports acted as a significant boost for the name Mercedes-Benz as a luxurious car for those clients who have sophisticated taste in automobiles. The company’s success in the American market space enabled the company to lay foundations in some renowned competitions in motorsports. The firm referred its finest cars to the Carrera Pan-American Mexico and the Grand Prix racing circuits. The sophisticated accomplishment on the race road built the company an undisputable status for building and becoming a technically innovative luxury car.

The production of commercial vehicles enhanced market development in the post-war era. The establishment of the newly formed German republic needed a novel and new communal transportation system. Daimler-Benz provided the appropriate and necessary state-of-the-art vehicles, buses, and trucks.

The stable ride and security of the company in the 60s as seen through the economic success of the preceding decade[32]. In the 1970s, the automobile faced a significant blow in instability, mainly caused by the oil crisis of 1973[33][34]. The high expectations of production capacity were mounted on the manufacturers due to oil scarcity, and governments laid a lot of pressure on the manufacturers to produce fuel-efficient cars to cut the foreign dependency on oil. Mercedes-Benz held its position while most of the industry changed its production grounds and manufacturing systems; Daimler-Benz held its position hence remained highly ranked internationally as a luxurious automobile manufacturer comprising busses and trucks. Mercedes Benz initiated considerable development at the finish of the 1950s[35]. At the onset of the oil predicament, Daimler-Benz realized, if the firm needed to retain the marketplace stake made, the company would continue to innovate to be ahead of others. The spirit of modernization moved the corporation for the next hundred years.

During this period, only three industrial developments took place. First, Daimler-Benz started the production of CFC-free climate-controlled vehicles. They realized that the CFC Automator’s chemicals were unfriendly to both the driver and the environment. Secondly, the control Area Network in communications systems of the car was made a typical feature to be used in their cars since 1992[36]. The Bosch industries developed the plan for industrial use. Still, Daimler-Benz grabbed the opportunity and used the technology in their luxury cars before other automobile manufacturers could adopt it. The third development was the intelligent key system that most of today’s drivers take pride in. having been invented by Siemens in the 90s, Mercedes-Benz adopted the key late in 1998[37]. The company has seen many numerous and tremendous changes over the years, some having been positive and others negative.

Conclusion

Mercedes-Benz has become a world-class automobile manufacturer. The company has taken a long journey to be where it is today. Facing the challenges imposed during the second world war and market-related struggles has proven the worthiness of the title. Production of Daimler and Maybach engines provided a ground foundation for the propulsion power of the whole Daimler-Benz manufacturing system. The Mercedes’ durability and effectiveness on the road have proven customers right that it is undoubtedly a world-class luxurious car. The international market has also laid a strong foundation for the high market value of Mercedes-Benz. The American market facilitated the universal growth rate of the company to date[38]. Motorsports have also provided a marketing ground for the company since it has proven effective enough to produce vehicles of high performance on the race track. The creation of Formula 1 enhanced the initial growth of Daimler-Benz on the race track while Grand Prix was on hold. The company is well established in the international market space. Today, Mercedes-Benz cars are widely used not only by civilians but also by most governments globally have adopted the use of the vehicles due to their efficiency, class, and luxury[39]. The level of style, efficiency, and design has given the company a competitive edge over other giant automobiles in the global market space. The firm has continued to retain its market share because of its innovativeness and customer experience hence; remaining one of the best automobile manufacturers in the global market space. The use of women in the manufacturing process indicated the high demand for automobiles during the onset of the war. At the same time, the majority of the men participated in the war, thus reducing the task force needed in the production chain for automobiles. The need for modernization in car manufacturing has intensified ever since. Germany has been a bedrock for producing reliable, stylish, well-designed, and luxurious vehicles. It has created a world mark on its automobiles. Mercedes-Benz has been a top-notch, well-manufactured vehicle in all aspects and dimensions needed and delivered to the customers.

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[1] Adler, Dennis. Mercedes-Benz. Motorbooks International, 2008.

[2] Hofner, H. “Mercedes-Benz motor cars. Vol. 2. From the Nuerburg to the 540 K (1929-1943)

[3] Gupta, Anil K., and Vijay Govindarajan. “Managing global expansion: A conceptual framework.” Business Horizons 43, no. 2 (2000)

[4] Kumar, Vijay, and Patrick Whitney. “Faster, cheaper, deeper user research.” Design Management Journal (Former Series)

[5] Kumar, Vijay, and Patrick Whitney. “Faster, cheaper, deeper user research.”

[6] Štrach, Pavel, and André M. Everett. “Brand corrosion: mass marketing’s threat to luxury automobile brands after merger and acquisition.”

McDermott, Michael C. “BMW and Mercedes-Benz first international plant location decision: the site selection and negotiation process in the USA.”

[8] Adler, Dennis. Mercedes-Benz. Motorbooks International, 2008.

[9] Hofner, H. “Mercedes-Benz motor cars. Vol. 2. From the Nuerburg to the 540 K (1929-1943); Mercedes-Benz Automobile.

[10] Gupta, Anil K., and Vijay Govindarajan. “Managing global expansion: A conceptual framework.” Business Horizons 43, no. 2 (2000)

[11] Kumar, Vijay, and Patrick Whitney. “Faster, cheaper, deeper user research.” Design Management Journal (Former Series) 14, no. 2 (2003): 50-57.

[12] Gerst, Detlef, Thomas Hardwig, Martin Kuhlmann, and Michael Schumann. “Group Work in the German Automobile Industry—The Case of Mercedes-Benz.”

[13] Gupta, Anil K., and Vijay Govindarajan. “Managing global expansion: A conceptual framework.” Business Horizons 43, no. 2 (2000)

[14] Kumar, Vijay, and Patrick Whitney. “Faster, cheaper, deeper user research.” Design Management Journal (Former Series)

[15] Scherner, Jonas, Jochen Streb, and Stephanie Tilly. “Supplier networks in the German aircraft industry during World War II and their long-term effects on West Germany’s automobile industry during the ‘Wirtschaftswunder.’

[16] Adler, Dennis. Mercedes-Benz. Motorbooks International, 2008.

[17] Adler, Dennis. Mercedes-Benz. Motorbooks International, 2008.

[18] Štrach, Pavel, and André M. Everett. “Brand corrosion: mass marketing’s threat to luxury automobile brands after merger and acquisition.”

[19] Scherner, Jonas, Jochen Streb, and Stephanie Tilly. “Supplier networks in the German aircraft industry during World War II and their long-term effects on West Germany’s automobile industry during the ‘Wirtschaftswunder.’

[20] Gupta, Anil K., and Vijay Govindarajan. “Managing global expansion: A conceptual framework.” Business Horizons 43, no. 2 (2000)

[21] Junior, Renato Ferreira, and Gabriela Scur. DEVELOPMENT OF PRODUCT-SERVICE SYSTEM BUSINESS MODEL: a study at Mercedes-Benz Brazil.

[22] Gerst, Detlef, Thomas Hardwig, Martin Kuhlmann, and Michael Schumann. “Group Work in the German Automobile Industry—The Case of Mercedes-Benz.”

[23] McDermott, Michael C. “Mercedes-Benz, Tuscaloosa, Alabama: Drivers and Processes in the International Plant Location Decision.”

[24] Gerst, Detlef, Thomas Hardwig, Martin Kuhlmann, and Michael Schumann. “Group Work in the German Automobile Industry—The Case of Mercedes-Benz.”

[25] Hofner, H. “Mercedes-Benz motor cars. Vol. 2. From the Nuerburg to the 540 K (1929-1943); Mercedes-Benz Automobile. Bd. 2. Vom Nuerburg zum 540 K (1929-1943).” (1998).

[26] Kumar, Vijay, and Patrick Whitney. “Faster, cheaper, deeper user research.” Design Management Journal (Former Series) 14, no. 2 (2003)

[27] Gupta, Anil K., and Vijay Govindarajan. “Managing global expansion: A conceptual framework.”

[28] Gupta, Anil K., and Vijay Govindarajan. “Managing global expansion: A conceptual framework.”

[29] Gupta, Anil K., and Vijay Govindarajan. “Managing global expansion: A conceptual framework.”

[30] Štrach, Pavel, and André M. Everett. “Brand corrosion: mass marketing’s threat to luxury automobile brands after merger and acquisition.”

[31] Štrach, Pavel, and André M. Everett. “Brand corrosion: mass marketing’s threat to luxury automobile brands after merger and acquisition.”

[32] Junior, Renato Ferreira, and Gabriela Scur. DEVELOPMENT OF PRODUCT-SERVICE SYSTEM BUSINESS MODEL: a study at Mercedes-Benz Brazil.

[33] McDermott, Michael C. “Mercedes-Benz, Tuscaloosa, Alabama: Drivers and Processes in the International Plant Location Decision.”

[34] Scherner, Jonas, Jochen Streb, and Stephanie Tilly. “Supplier networks in the German aircraft industry during World War II and their long-term effects on West Germany’s automobile industry during the ‘Wirtschaftswunder.’

[35] Adler, Dennis. Mercedes-Benz. Motorbooks International, 2008.

[36] Junior, Renato Ferreira, and Gabriela Scur. DEVELOPMENT OF PRODUCT-SERVICE SYSTEM BUSINESS MODEL: a study at Mercedes-Benz Brazil. No. 2019-36-0093. SAE Technical Paper, 2020.

[37] McDermott, Michael C. “BMW and Mercedes-Benz first international plant location decision: the site selection and negotiation process in the USA.”

[38] Kumar, Vijay, and Patrick Whitney. “Faster, cheaper, deeper user research.” Design Management Journal (Former Series) 14, no. 2 (2003): 50-57.

[39] Gerst, Detlef, Thomas Hardwig, Martin Kuhlmann, and Michael Schumann. “Group Work in the German Automobile Industry—The Case of Mercedes-Benz.”

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