Obesity Prevention And Weight Management Theory Free Writing Sample

Nursing Theory for Obesity Prevention

The issue of obesity prevention within the project will be guided by a nursing theory. One of the theories applicable in case of childhood overweight is a middle-range theory of weight management (Pickett, Peters, & Jarosz, 2014). The focus of this theory is on psychosocial, cultural, and environmental factors that have an impact on the behaviors responsible for weight control. In fact, this theory is a deductive continuation of Oren’s theory of self-care related to the issue of self-care deficit (Alligood, 2014).

The theory comprises the following concepts that are significant for obesity prevention. These concepts are “weight management behaviors, weight management agency, weight contextual factors and weight control” (Pickett et al., 2014, p. 243). The concept of weight management behavior is related to the concept of self-care. It presupposes behaviors directed at the preservation of caloric balance. In addition, it includes physical activity as a necessary component of weight management.

Weight management agency can be explained as “the ability to engage in weight management behaviors” (Pickett et al., 2014, p. 244). It is related to the concept of self-care agency. Weight management agency comprises ideas related to personal weight, motivation to manage weight, and knowledge of weight management. On the whole, weight management agency accumulates interventions aimed at weight control.

Weight contextual factors include the factors that have an impact on the capability for weight management and influence the individual’s requisites related to weight such as dietary preferences or the balance between activity and rest (Pickett et al., 2014). Moreover, these contextual factors include age, gender, comorbid conditions, socio-cultural background, and the impact of environmental and socioeconomic factors.

Finally, weight control is a significant component of this theory. In fact, it is compared to the concept of health. Also, weight control is a final goal of the project. It results from weight management behaviors that can be developed in project participants under the guidance of a professional nurse. The expected results of weight control are normalization of the actual body weight as well as the body mass index (BMI).

Implementation Plan and Outcome Measures

The implementation plan for the project will comprise the following stages. First of all, it is necessary to select personnel and provide their teaching to prepare them to work with children. The majority of professional nurses are prepared to work with adults in the aspect of managing obesity (Zhu, Norman, & While, 2013). Nevertheless, they lack the necessary experience with children and need additional training. Another important aspect of the implementation plan is the selection of project participants and informing them about the conditions of joining the project. The next stage is the implementation of a social-network-based intervention, which will be followed by measuring project outcomes.

The measurement of the project outcomes consists of three stages. During the first one, the measurements such as the height, weight, and body mass index, are reassured. The second measurement takes place after project completion. It helps to evaluate immediate results of the project. Finally, a control measurement will take place six months after the end of the project. It will allow assessing weight management behaviors developed in the course of the project.

Potential Barriers to Plan Implementation and Ways to Overcome Them

Despite careful preparation, both practical and theoretical, some barriers can appear on the way to plan implementation. The first possible barrier is the lack of qualified nursing personnel with the experience of work with children (Penn & Kerr, 2014). This barrier can be overcome through introduction of an educational intervention for nursing staff focused on children with obesity. Another possible barrier is low interest of the potential participants of the project. Frequently, children with obesity refuse to acknowledge the problem and prefer staying uninvolved in any interventions aimed at obesity reduction and prevention.

However, this barrier can be addressed by a peculiarity of this project, which is the implementation of social networks. It allows staying anonymous and thus can attract more participants than the projects where physical presence is important. Finally, there can be a problem with outcomes measurement after project implementation and in six months due to problems with contacting all of the participants. To attract children and make them interested in reporting their results, it is a good idea to involve some bonuses such as free tickets to the movies to those participants who report their results.

Conclusion

On the whole, the project addresses a burning issue of childhood obesity. It implies an innovative social-network-based educational intervention, which is expected to attract more participants and demonstrate better results. The project demands careful preparation including the choice of staff and its training as well as stimulation of participants to report results. In this project, the role of a nurse is, probably, the most important one. Nurse professionals will be responsible for educational interventions and might need additional training. Finally, the project is expected to be effective for children with obesity who realize they have a weight problem and are ready to resolve it.

References

Alligood, M.R. (Ed.). (2014). Nursing theorists and their work. St. Louis, MS: Elsevier Mosby.

Penn, S., & Kerr, J. (2014). Childhood obesity: The challenges for nurses. Nursing Children & Young People, 26(2), 16-21. Web.

Pickett, S., Peters, R., & Jarosz, P. (2014). Toward a middle–range theory of weight management. Nursing Science Quarterly, 27(3), 242-247. Web.

Zhu, D., Norman, I., & While, A. (2013). Nurses’ self-efficacy and practices relating to weight management of adult patients: A path analysis. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 10(1), 131-141. Web.

Corporate Gym Marketing Plan

Introduction

This marketing plan is a part of a proposal for a corporate CrossFit gym. It will be used by the company’s employees but also be open to the general public and advertised to them. As a result, it will improve the overall community’s health while also generating some revenue for the business. The presence of trainers who work using the CrossFit program will be the central selling point of the gym.

The approach is becoming increasingly popular across the nation due to its effectiveness. As such, it should attract a substantial number of people who want to try it and see the results. Overall, there is considerable potential for improvement in the well-being of the employees and some additional profit. This case brief will describe the current market situation, formulate the gym’s strategy, and provide a forecast of its performance.

Situation Analysis

The gym market in the United States is substantial but likely not fully saturated. According to Fried and Mumcu, 58 million Americans with an average age of 40 used a gym or health club annually, generating $21.8 billion in revenue every year (6). The figure represents approximately 20% of the nation’s overall population, indicating that there may be potential for further growth. However, Trugman claims that the industry’s expansion rate has slowed and attributes the trend to excessively high membership prices (170). Overall, the target population appears to be middle-aged people with substantial disposable income. They want to improve their health but can be price-conscious, emphasizing the price to the perceived effect ratio. They will come to a gym because few alternatives exist for combating obesity and improving one’s health.

However, competition between gyms is strong in the area, as they try to attract the same customer base. They try to implement various attractive features such as discount deals for families or highly specialized equipment. They devote particular attention to trainers, who constitute a substantial part of a gym’s attraction and can form a personal customer base. With that said, there are no CrossFit gyms in the area, which represents a substantial opportunity.

The positivity of the situation is supplemented by the current stable growth trends in the U.S. economy. The Consumer Price Index increased by 2.3% in 2019, indicating steady and controlled inflation and overall economic growth (“Consumer Price Index Summary”). Consumer spending is likely growing along with it, making them more likely to consider an investment into a gym membership and expanding the overall customer base.

Marketing Strategy

CrossFit is a somewhat different approach to traditional gyms that appeals to a slightly different audience. According to “The Business of CrossFit,” nearly half of the brand’s customer base is aged 25-34, and more than half earn $150,000 or more every year. As such, the gym will market itself to that customer base and use the power of the name to attract customers with no alternatives, positioning itself as an accessible, community-focused health option.

As per the central CrossFit proposal, its product portfolio will consist of an exercising regimen under the supervision of a trainer, with the value offer consisting of its unique and particularly effective nature. Due to this unique proposition and the high income of the customer base, premium prices can be justified. With that said, the company’s employees will receive substantial discounts or be able to use the services for free. Within five years, the gym should acquire a stable audience of three hundred members who regularly visit it.

CrossFit follows an indirect distribution policy as a brand, affiliating with various gyms across the nation and allowing them to use its programs. With that said, the facility proposed in this plan will be a direct distributor, offering health services to visitors on-site.

Similarly, unlike CrossFit’s B2B model, the company gym will operate based on a B2C paradigm. It will use a combined marketing approach that consists of traditional advertising, online presence, and branding. The first two can let target audiences know about the opening of a new gym so that they can decide to attend it. The CrossFit branding will be used as the main differentiating point that will motivate customers to choose the facility over its competition. The brand’s online presence can also be useful in supplementing the reach of the gym due to its substantial follower base on several social media.

Implementation Plan

  1. Secure a building and prepare it for gym activities: $20,000, 2 months. The progress of the repair crew will be regularly monitored, and the final check will be conducted via visual inspection.
  2. Contact CrossFit and become an affiliate: $10,000, 2 weeks. Evaluation in this stage will occur via analysis of the company’s responses, with a positive answer serving as the mark of success.
  3. Begin initial promotions with the help of CrossFit: $15,000, 3 months. Customer feedback, particularly on the Internet and social media, will serve as the primary method of evaluating the campaign’s effectiveness.
  4. Hire coaches for the gym: $15,000, 2 months. The HR department of the company can handle parts of this process with the gym’s management and apply its established monitoring and evaluation tools correspondingly.
  5. Purchase and install the necessary equipment: $10,000, 2 weeks. The acquisitions department will oversee the process, and the gym management will measure customer feedback upon using the tools and use it for future reference.
  6. Finalize the preparations and open the gym: $5,000, 2 weeks. During this time, management will try to discover any potential issues and address them before the opening of the facility. Afterward, it will collect customer feedback on aspects they liked and dislike and act on it.

Financial Projection

It should be noted that since the gym only offers one product, a separate sales forecast is unnecessary.

PROFIT & LOSS ($) JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC YEAR
SALES FORECAST ($) $ 22,500 $ 24,000 $ 25,500 $ 27,000 $ 28,500 $ 30,000 $ 31,500 $ 33,000 $ 34,500 $ 36,000 $ 37,500 $ 39,000 $ 369,000
TOTAL COST OF SALES ($) $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 12,500 $ 150,000
Returns, Discounts, Distribution agreements, Others $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 5,625 $ 67,500
TOTAL GROSS PROFIT ($) $ 4,375 $ 5,875 $ 7,375 $ 8,875 $ 10,375 $ 11,875 $ 13,375 $ 14,875 $ 16,375 $ 17,875 $ 19,375 $ 20,875 $ 151,500
Marketing & Corporate Communication $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 $ 12,000
Salaries $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 48,000
Rent $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 $ 15,000
Office Supplies & Maintenance $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 500 $ 6,000
Insurance $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 200 $ 2,400
Telecommunications $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
Travel $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
Depreciation & Amortization $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 150 $ 1,800
Other Expenses $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 100 $ 1,200
Total EXPENSES ($) $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 7,200 $ 86,400
EARNINGS BEFORE INTEREST & TAXES ($) -$ 2,825 -$ 1,325 $ 175 $ 1,675 $ 3,175 $ 4,675 $ 6,175 $ 7,675 $ 9,175 $ 10,675 $ 12,175 $ 13,675 $ 65,100
Interest Expenses ($) $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 750 $ 9,000
EARNINGS BEFORE TAXES ($) -$ 3,575 -$ 2,075 -$ 575 $ 925 $ 2,425 $ 3,925 $ 5,425 $ 6,925 $ 8,425 $ 9,925 $ 11,425 $ 12,925 $ 56,100
Income Taxes ($) $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 194 $ 509 $ 824 $ 1,139 $ 1,454 $ 1,769 $ 2,084 $ 2,399 $ 2,714 $ 13,088
NET EARNINGS ($) -$ 3,575 -$ 2,075 -$ 575 $ 731 $ 1,916 $ 3,101 $ 4,286 $ 5,471 $ 6,656 $ 7,841 $ 9,026 $ 10,211 $ 43,012

Detailed Annual Budget

CATEGORY Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 TOTAL YEAR
JAN FEB MAR Q1 TOTAL APR MAY JUN Q2 TOTAL JUL AUG SEP Q3 TOTAL OCT NOV DEC Q4 TOTAL
ADVERTISING $450 $450 $450 $1,350 $450 $450 $450 $1,350 $450 $450 $450 $1,350 $450 $450 $450 $1,350 $5,400
Online $150 $150 $150 $450 $150 $150 $150 $450 $150 $150 $150 $450 $150 $150 $150 $450 $1,800
Print $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $1,200
Radio $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $1,200
Television $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $1,200
PRINTED MATERIALS $60 $60 $60 $180 $60 $60 $60 $180 $60 $60 $60 $180 $60 $60 $60 $180 $720
Catalogues $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $240
Vouchers $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $240
Others $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $240
SOCIAL MEDIA $400 $400 $400 $1,200 $400 $400 $400 $1,200 $400 $400 $400 $1,200 $400 $400 $400 $1,200 $4,800
Twitter $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $1,200
Facebook $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $1,200
Pinterest $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $1,200
Instagram $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $100 $100 $100 $300 $1,200
DIGITAL MARKETING $300 $20 $20 $340 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $520
Website $300 $20 $20 $340 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $20 $20 $20 $60 $520
RESEARCH $50 $50 $50 $150 $50 $50 $50 $150 $50 $50 $50 $150 $50 $50 $50 $150 $600
Surveys $50 $50 $50 $150 $50 $50 $50 $150 $50 $50 $50 $150 $50 $50 $50 $150 $600
TOTALS $1,260 $980 $980 $3,220 $980 $980 $980 $2,940 $980 $980 $980 $2,940 $980 $980 $980 $2,940 $12,040

Control Tools

Both the performance of the gym and the effectiveness of its marketing warrant continuous reviews. As can be seen in the projection, an adequate number of customers to make the gym profitable likely will not come in immediately after the gym’s opening. As such, to succeed, it will need to attract additional visitors, whether through word of mouth or advertising. Its financial performance should be subject to review over every quarter and compared to the projection. If the gym is underperforming, additional marketing, as well as information gathering, are required. There is likely some issue that is hurting its performance and that the gym may be able to recover the losses after it is resolved.

It is critical to monitor marketing engagement by observing the interactions that its advertisements and social media accounts receive. It is possible to do so for traditional media by analyzing the number of viewers. For Internet-based services, there should be more detailed metrics available that can highlight the types of audiences that interact with the gym’s promotions. Feedback gathering will also be possible on social networks, which should constitute a substantial portion of the brand’s presence. Based on the information obtained in these ways as well as surveys of current customers and how they have heard of the gym, the management can determine the most effective channels. Afterward, it can decide to try and imitate its successes in other media or focus on its most effective ones.

Conclusion

There appears to be substantial potential for profit in the enterprise in addition to its health benefits for company staff and the community. The absence of a CrossFit gym nearby creates an excellent opportunity to open a premium facility without incurring high equipment costs. It should target populations with high income and age of 25-34, which are not the main audience of traditional gyms. As such, while physical marketing is important, Internet-based advertising and a social network presence may be more beneficial in this case. The gym should pay for itself in the first three years of its existence, assuming it performs at or slightly below projections.

Works Cited

Fried, Gil, and Ceyda Mumcu, editors. Sport Analytics: A Data-Driven Approach to Sport Business and Management. Routledge, 2017.

Trugman, Gary R. Understanding Business Valuation: A Practical Guide to Valuing Small to Medium Sized Businesses. 5th ed., AICPA, 2017.

“Consumer Price Index Summary.” U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 2020. Web.

The Business of CrossFit: An Update on New Market Research.Rally Fitness. 2017. Web.

Afro-American And Amish Heritage & Health Beliefs

Introduction

Cultural peculiarities of national minorities have the impact on the life of people in the United States. Being one of the most multinational countries, the US gives much attention to the cultural heritage of its citizens who represent different ethnic and racial groups. Cultural heritage is particularly important in health care, where the knowledge of the patient’s district features and preferences can positively influence the process of care. This paper analyses the cultural development of African American and Amish heritage in the United States as well as the influence of cultural beliefs on health care.

Cultural Development of African American and Amish Heritage in the US

African Americans make up one of the biggest minority group in the United States, representing more than 14% of the American population (Giger, 2013). The first African Americans were brought here as slaves, and their culture is an interpretation of original African roots in the American context. The majority of African American population speaks English and identify themselves as American (Purnell, 2014).

These people tend to be emotional and open, their speech is expressive and loud, accompanied with active gestures and facial expressions. Many African American families are matriarchal and usually extended. Religion is a significant aspect of African American culture.

Amish population is not so numerous in the United States. They are descendants of the Anabaptists from Europe of the sixteenth century (Giger, 2013). The Amish arrived in North America together with other religious groups in the middle of the nineteenth century. Their culture is considered to be a high-context one. The Amish live in relative social isolation, which has an impact on their behaviors. Thus, their houses do not have electricity, and they are very selective in adopting technology (Purnell, 2014). In their communication, the Amish are rather preserved and do not demonstrate feelings in public. The Amish people value their personal space, and their houses are usually large. Their society is patriarchal, but women are treated with respect and have a high status.

The Impact of Cultural Beliefs of African American and Amish Heritage on Health Care in the US

Cultural beliefs of different ethnic groups are meaningful for healthcare. For example, the lack of knowledge of English, which is the official language of the country of residence, can become a problem in communicating with patients. Thus, African Americans have a specific dialect that can be difficult to understand and this peculiarity should be considered by nurses (Giger, 2013). Also, the loud voice of African American patients should not be considered to be a demonstration of anger but another cultural peculiarity. One more detail to remember about African Americans is the use of complementary and alternative medicine, which is popular within this ethnic group (Majumdar, Thompson, Ahmad, Gordon, & Addison, 2013).

Family plays a crucial role in both Amish and African American societies. This fact should be taken into account as well. Personal space preferences are significant for healthcare process. Thus, while African Americans are comfortable with people standing near them, the Amish prefer more personal space and may feel uncomfortable during physical examination (Purnell, 2014). Another specific feature to consider about the Amish is that they are not demonstrative and may not express suffering or joy.

Conclusion

Generally speaking, cultural heritage is important for every ethnocultural group. In the course of time, it determined their perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors. These specific features should be taken into account by healthcare providers to make the process of care more comfortable and effective. Moreover, culturally-competent care is expected to lead to better patient outcomes.

References

Giger, J. (2013). Transcultural nursing: Assessment and intervention (6th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Majumdar, S., Thompson, W., Ahmad, N., Gordon, C., & Addison, C. (2013). The use and effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine for pain in sickle cell anemia. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 19(4), 184-187. Web.

Purnell, L. D. (2014). Guide to culturally competent health care (3rd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis Company.