The Life According To Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa Writing Sample

The Life according to Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa

Dr. Ishikawa`s life is remembered for his roles as a creator, author, teacher, mentor, and brother.

His definition of quality control was “To practice quality control is to develop, design, produce and service a quality product which is most economical, most useful and always satisfactory to the consumer. To meet this goal, everyone in the company must participate in and promote quality control, including top executives, all divisions within the company and all employees.

Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa was born in Tokyo on July 13th 1915 as one of eight sons to his mother Chiro Ishikawa. He lived a full life of 73 years.

He passed away in April of 1989 but will be remembered as the creator of the Ishikawa diagram also known as the Fishbone diagram used to determine root causes. It was first used in the 1940s and is considered one of the seven basic tools of quality control (Tague). Ishikawa_Fishbone_Diagram.svg

Dr. Ishikawa was honored with accolades including the Deming Prize, the Nihon Keizai Press Prize, and the Industrial Standardization Prize for his significant contributions to quality control. Moreover, he received the Grant Award from the American Society for Quality Control in recognition of his educational program on quality control. After graduating from the University of Tokyo in 1939 with a degree in applied chemistry, Dr. Ishikawa served as a naval technical officer until 1941 and subsequently joined Nissan Liquid Fuel Company where he worked until 1947.

One might say that Ishikawa was quickly advancing towards a bigger objective. He became a member of the Japanese Union of Scientists and Engineers JUSE quality control research group in 1949. In 1978, he achieved the presidency of the Musashi Institute of Technology. Simultaneously, he obtained his Doctorate of Engineering and became a full professor in the Faculty of Engineering at The University of Tokyo. Furthermore, he introduced the concept of quality circles in conjunction with JUSE. But Ishikawa didn’t halt at that point; he also authored multiple books titled “What is Total.”

Quality Control

The Japanese Way and Guide to Quality Control (Industrial engineering & technology). According to Dr. Ishikawa, through total quality control involving all employees, including the president, any company can enhance its products/services, reduce costs, boost sales, increase profit, and transform into a better organization. Big corporations like Komatsu, IBM, and Bridgestone have sought Dr. Ishikawa’s help to produce superior quality products at significantly reduced expenses.

His philosophy of total quality management can be summarized by his creation of eleven points. Some of these points include the idea that quality begins and ends with education, top management should not display anger when presented with facts by subordinates, and data without dispersion information (i.e., variability) is considered false data. “Ishikawa expanded on Feigenbaum’s total quality concept by advocating for increased participation from all employees, from top management to frontline staff, and reducing reliance on quality professionals and departments” (Evans).

It is the responsibility of all individuals within the company to ensure that the products produced are of high quality. According to Neuhauser, improving people’s quality of life directly contributes to better service outcomes and productivity.

Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa, a visionary, aimed to reform internal and external operations of companies. He emphasized that the well-being of individuals associated with the company should be the primary concern in management.

If a company cannot prioritize the happiness of people or fails to make them happy, it should not be permitted to exist. It would be optimal if all companies adhered to this principle.

References

  1. D, Neuhauser . Kaoru Ishikawa from fishbones to world peace: Qual Saf Health Care 2008;17:150-152, Retrieved November 12, 2011
  2. Evans, E. , Lindsay, W. (2008). Managing for Quality and Performance Excellence. Mason, Ohio. (pg 112) Tague, Nancy (2004).
  3. “Seven Basic Quality Tools”. The Quality Toolbox. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: American Society for Quality. p. 15. Retrieved November 10, 2011.

India A Land Of Opportunities Essay

Are you looking for a job abroad? Have you wanted to move overseas for a long time? Even if you’re tempted to explore the grass on the other side of the fence, think twice before seeking work opportunities abroad. India registered a rapid growth of 9. 7 per cent last year and has bounced back strongly post recession. Apart from jobs in various sectors, it has led to emerging opportunities for entrepreneurs. At the same time, the rest of the world is still facing economic lows. Is it then the right time to move abroad for a job?

With recessionary fears looming over numerous economies, many experts believe it is not. How do prospects in India compare as against those abroad? Ravi Ramakrishnan, director, TMI Network, gives an overview, “European opportunities are completely wiped out post recession, with most countries erecting strong barriers to entry for overseas talent. With nil growth or negative growth in most economies, a number of which are also close to collapse, who would opt to go there? Except for MNCs which transfer Indian managers or staff overseas, there are not too many viable opportunities in Europe.

If you consider the US, earlier on, jobs were largely available in manufacturing, which is in the doldrums now. Even the middle-east is not as interesting any more as it was earlier. The social and political turmoil has made it less attractive. ” Based on an overall comparison of jobs abroad with those in India, which one is better, given the timing and the current global job market? T Sreedhar, MD, TMI Network, says, “With GDP growing at over 8 per cent, India has a big enough domestic market that is somewhat decoupled from the world and can handle global slowdowns.

The best option for Indian professionals aspiring for global exposure is to work with an Indian company that has international operations or to work for an MNC which periodically moves employees overseas. ” Then there are those who see a balanced global equation. “It’s all about seeking an opportunity; if there is an opportunity that fulfils all the parameters that you have carved for yourself than going to the west would make sense. Recession did impact the job market; if you look at the 2008-09 phase, there were huge lay-offs and salary cuts.

Recruitments were frozen. In fact, with some of Obama’s protectionism-driven policies, India and other parts of the world did face the heat. At the same time, employment opportunities in certain sectors were not affected as much. For instance, if finance jobs were scarce, risk management jobs were suddenly in abundance. Doctors with requisite qualifications were also in demand and continue to be so,” says Gaurav Mendiratta, founder director, AKG Technologies who studied and worked in the US before moving back to India to start his own company.

The decision to look for a job abroad depends a lot on the person’s own preferences. Debasis Chatterji, CEO, Netxcell Limited says, “If an opportunity provides global exposure along with a good pay package, it could be a wise decision to take up the offer. But if the candidate has good prospects, scope to innovate and to learn in his/her current job, it would be more appropriate to continue. Some specific project or assignment abroad could be attractive due to such reasons. It all depends on the objective of the candidate. Taking the macroeconomic environment into account, one can safely say that the trends point towards a large wave of reverse brain drain, likely to become more pronounced in the future. Rahul Kulkarni, head, HR, Kale Consultants, says, “It is not an appropriate step to explore jobs abroad when you are in a country like India, which is recording 8. 5 per cent GDP growth. Companies overseas are targeting emerging nations; it proves that in the near future there will be continuing growth of opportunities. The reverse brain drain trend has already started.

The glamour attached to the trend of going abroad for jobs is declining, which is why there is no point in going abroad. Stay back in your country and add to it by your flair of talent. In the coming years, India would be more efficient in providing updated infrastructure and advanced platforms to nurture talent . It would influence skilled professionals to come back. ” And while every coin has two sides, you can always bet for either head or tail. For an Indian professional, almost all fingers point homeward.

Compare And Contrast Egypt And Mesopotamia

Egypt developed around the Nile River, while Mesopotamia developed between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. Egypt and Mesopotamia grew into complex civilizations. Politically, both Egypt and Mesopotamia had a government with one main ruler, but Egypt had a centralized government with a pharaoh, while Mesopotamia had a decentralized government with a king. Socially, both civilizations were patriarchal, but Egypt was more lenient towards women while Mesopotamia was stricter. The political and social structures of Egypt and Mesopotamia both similarities and differences.

Politically, although both Egypt and Mesopotamia had one main ruler, Egypt was centralized and whereas Mesopotamia was decentralized. Egypt centralized government led to a sense of unity that allowed them to develop as a whole, and grow together. The almighty pharaoh could authorize community projects, like the building of monumental pyramids. Within these pyramids, the pharaoh was buried alongside all his possessions that he would need in the afterlife, including his servants.

This represents the power that the pharaoh had over Egypt. Due to its decentralized government, Mesopotamia did not have the unity that Egypt enjoyed. Kings, with the help of a local council, ruled the numerous city-states that made up Mesopotamia. Since these kings did not have access to an entire empire, they did not hold as much power as the pharaoh of Europe was able to acquire. A lack of natural barriers and a constant competition for power led to continuous warfare also contributed to Mesopotamia’s lack of unity.

On account of Egypt’s centralized government and Mesopotamia’s decentralized government, the two societies differentiated on their political structures. Socially, even though both civilizations were patriarchal, the Egyptians were less strict than the Mesopotamians towards their female population. In Egypt, women had the ability to divorce their husbands, receive alimony, own land, educate children, and even become priestesses. The Egyptian women enjoyed many privileges that women during this time period normally did not have access to. However, in Mesopotamia, the males subjugated the women.

To stop married women from tempting other men, they were forced to cover their bodies, except for their faces, with veils. Women in Mesopotamia were often arranged into marriages, without a say on the subject. The Mesopotamian women had little impact on their society, while certain Egyptian women were able to gain highly influential positions in their society. One Egyptian woman even became the Queen of Egypt, alongside her son. Due to Egypt being less strict towards the women, Egyptian women were able to have a greater influence on their society.

Although both civilizations were patriarchal, they varied on how strict they were towards women. Ancient civilizations surrounding Egypt and Mesopotamia during this time period had similar political and social structures to either of the civilizations. Most societies with a centralized government did not see their rulers as divine as pharaohs. Some civilizations, like the Chinese rulers and their Mandate of Heaven, ruled with a power similar to the Egyptian pharaohs. However, the Chinese empire could also be overthrown if they were a bad ruler.

The Greek city-states also constantly fought each to gain power over all of Greece. Socially, ancient civilizations were not as lenient towards their women. Since social inequalities developed starting around the development of agriculture, women of ancient times were treated as inferior subjects. Globally during this time period, civilizations tended to vary from centralized to decentralized governments, with different opinions when it came to the female population. Egypt and Mesopotamia had similarities and differences pertaining to their political and social structures.

While both civilizations had one main ruler, Egypt was united under a centralized government and Mesopotamia was divided into city-states with a decentralized government. Both civilizations were patriarchal, but Egypt was a lot less strict towards women than Mesopotamia. Outline of CC Rewrite I. Thesis Paragraph * Thesis: The political and social structures of Egypt and Mesopotamia both similarities and differences. * Road Map: Politically, both Egypt and Mesopotamia had a government with one main ruler, but Egypt had a centralized government with a pharaoh, while Mesopotamia had a decentralized government with a king.

Socially, both civilizations were patriarchal, but Egypt was more lenient towards women while Mesopotamia was stricter. II. Body Paragraph #1 – Political Similarities and Differences * Topic Sentence: Politically, although both Egypt and Mesopotamia had one main ruler, Egypt was centralized and whereas Mesopotamia was decentralized. * Comparison: Both have one main ruler * Contrast #1: Egypt centralized while Mesopotamia decentralized * Contrast #2: Egypt unified while Mesopotamian city-states fought for power. III.

Body Paragraph #2 – Social Similarities and Differences * Topic Sentence: Socially, even though both civilizations were patriarchal, the Egyptians were less strict than the Mesopotamians towards their female population. * Compare: Both patriarchal * Contrast #1: The various freedoms Egyptian women had, versus the subjugation of Mesopotamian women. * Contrast #2: Egyptian women could have greater impact on society, like Egyptian Queen. Mesopotamian women controlled much more by men. IV. Relating to larger global context Topic sentence: Ancient civilizations surrounding Egypt and Mesopotamia during this time period had similar political and social structures to either of the civilizations. * Compare Political: Civilzations like China also had very powerful rulers like Egypt. Civilizations like Greece had city-states that constantly fought for power. * Compare Social: Most civilizations looked down on women due to inequalities that developed with the rise of agriculture. V. Conclusion * Egypt and Mesopotamia had similarities and differences pertaining to their political and social structures.

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