The Main Reasons For The Political Tensions In Fiji And The Role Christianity Plays Sample Assignment

Christianity should be inclusive yet elusive to many since there are fundamental aspects that drive perception. Fiji’s experience offers essential insights into discussions about political instability and appropriate ways to organize the state in international communities (Ngin, Chanrith, et al. 299). In current multiracial studies, very little attention is paid to colonial roots and policies. Integration would require greater sensitivity and compassion qualities, a disease dangerous to Fijian natives where they were in short supply.

The constitutional framework of state and national power in Fiji, since independence, has been more important than economic or social structures because of racial divisions. However, the history of Fiji’s colonies led to mistrust and conflict between the two major communities as a matter of policy. Traditionally, Fiji’s financial and political expansion has fashioned inequality and deep splits among various ethnic factions (Loga et al., np). Political tensions remained hinged on the country’s national fabric, and Christianity plays a significant role in promoting certain ideologies within the country’s social setting.

Uprising and conflicts

The country has been overthrown four times by the military uprising since 1987, primarily due to tensions between the majority of Fiji’s indigenous people and the economically powerful Indian minority (Naidu, Vijay, et al. 7). The value of integration in as far as the national context of the Fijian context goes there is the element of sensitivity requiring fundamental factors including compassion which seems to lack. The minority, including the Banaban, Rotuma, Chinese, Melanesians, and other Pacific Islanders, is generally politically and administratively indistinguishable.

The latest 2006 overthrow, led by Commodore Josaia Voreqe Bainimarama, has pledged its commitment to generating a multi-ethnic Fiji and terminating the scheme of dividing Fijians into ethnic groups. However, Fiji’s martial administration has been widely disapproved for violating the right to freedom of expression, media, peaceful assembly, and association. Douglas et al. (2018) offers an insightful piece that creates an economic and political understanding of the tensions affecting how Fijians interact. Nevertheless, mistrust within the social setting cannot be ignored as a fundamental factor.

Therefore, it plays a momentous role in contemporary Fiji, with a more in-depth look at how Christians convert for partisan explanations and embrace Christian principles as communities. The contextual social enterprise in Fiji impacts individuals who perceive themselves as Christians with cultural effects on their belief system (Douglas et al.np). The local, historic, and recognized impacts on the social innovativeness in a minor Pacific Island nation. There is an essential consideration to the colonial system approach that drew the ideological differences in the country, exploring them in the process.

The Origin of the Social Enterprise

The concept by Douglas et al. looks at the Fijian environment, antiquity, and societal, financial, party-political, and enlightening institutions that affect the social innovativeness. The social creativity is predisposed by Fiji’s inaccessible position and minor economy, limiting admission to foreign knowledge and suggesting that the state is slow to accept new philosophies. One would have expected the value that Christianity impacts on society would push the integration of the masses to the extent to which the country would fuse. Fiji’s population, ethnicity, and enlightening systems generate financial and partisan pressures that disturb how sustenance capitals and economic strategies are distributed (Douglas et al., np).

The concept of Christianity did little to advance the integration process, with specific qualities lacking in their approach, where integration requires greater sensitivity and compassion qualities. The introduction of Indians to Fiji under British colonial rule and Fijians of Indian origin now makes up about 40 percent of the population’s importance in understanding the region’s diversity and captures underlying issues that need addressing (Douglas et al., np). The informal divisions and growing pressures among these Fijian Indians and native Fijians have underwritten to party-political unpredictability (Craney, Aidan, np).

The migration of non-native peoples has condensed human resources and professional standards. It undermines Fiji’s innovativeness, including developing a robust public-sector enterprise. At the same time, social enterprise may be the most operative way to deal with communal and financial difficulties in Fiji. It, therefore, seems improbable that the régime accepts the idea deprived of sustenance and reassurance from outside sources, especially universal aid and UN activities. Ngin, Chanrith, et al. (299) posits that it is essential to explore the aspect of faith in the Fijian context and what it means to be a believer while still practicing cultural beliefs.

The impact of proactivity by religion

Ngin, Chanrith, et al. provides critical insight into institutions at risk from immigration and how they cope; their integration and coordination of social grants, which are essential in execution of this part, may be barred by linguistic barricades, generation differences, membership differences, personal conflicts, and political divisions (Craney, Aidan, np). Cambodian and Thai groups in Auckland, New Zealand, offer some insightful approaches on religion as the role of Buddhist shrines in disaster attentiveness, response, and retrieval, and barriers to improving this part and hence impacting the society positively.

It is an approach that Ngin, Chanrith, et al. (300) advances that lacks within the context of Christianity becoming a reactionary entity instead of advancing practical steps to promote integration. In that instance, among the groups, Buddhist sanctuaries are recognized as places of communal association and distribution of information and may serve as significant places to seek help during a significant crisis promoting community integration. The argument advanced by Ngin, Chanrith et al. (304) that Buddhist sanctuaries have a part in helping their memberships formulate, respond to, and recuperate from catastrophic events indicates its impact on the community.

Understanding the constitutional framework of state and national power in Fiji, since independence, has been more important than economic or social structures because of racial divisions (Loga et al., np). It is possible because these institutions are centers of religious affiliation, reconciliation, compassion, and cultural adherence. Christianity should advance the social enterprise and integration while at it since it is prejudiced by Fiji’s isolated position and tiny economy, limiting aspects to foreign awareness and suggesting that the nation is slow to receive new philosophies.

Disaster Risk lessening in Migrant Societies

However, their integration and coordination of social grants, which are essential in accomplishment this part, may be striped by language barricades, generation differences, membership differences, personal battles, and political partitions. It concludes that the part of religious organizations in disaster jeopardy lessening in migrant societies living in Global North cities need to be carefully monitored, especially in terms of their internal and external fragmentation (Loga et al., np). A better understanding of these complexities enables the intervention to manage conflict and consider the different interests and values of the affected communities.

Modern inter-ethnic relationships and discernment have past and circumstantial magnitudes (Naidu, Vijay, et al.). Colonist culture was created on a pyramid of race and discrepancy behavior founded on origin. The colonist management reinvigorated the distinct financial expansion of different societies. The system shaped a three-tier up economic construction with Europeans and Chinese at the highest tier, trailed by ‘Indians’ in the middle tier, and ‘Fijians in the lowest tier.’ Religious institutions’ role in disaster risk reduction in the migrant communities of Global North cities should be carefully assessed.

A better comprehension of these difficulties will enable the intervention to manage conflict and consider the attractions and values of the altered societies, especially in terms of their internal and external fragmentation. The research to build on the thesis and correlate with the context of Christianity and its impact on conflict prevention and resolution (Naidu, Vijay, et al., np). Integration would require greater sensitivity and compassion qualities, a disease dangerous to Fijian natives where they were in short supply. The history of Fiji’s colonies led to mistrust and conflict between the two major communities as a matter of policy.

Religion Perception and Conflict

There seems to be an underlying aspect of misunderstanding of the concept of religion by the native, making the factor of integration elusive and hence challenging from a Christian perspective. Loga et al. Path-dependency philosophy in a post-conflict state offer some insightful information on path dependency within the Fijian context. Most notably is the need to explore how religion is intertwined with the existing social and cultural aspects that dictate societal behavior and conduct by offering immense information on the discussion on political tensions and the role of Christianity in the process.

In essence, Fiji’s experience offers essential insights into discussions about political instability and appropriate ways to organize the state in international communities and the role of Christianity in the process (Craney, Aidan, np). While analyzing the conflict as a roadmap, the article shows how unintended decree during Fiji’s colonial rule and the brief time it took for the state to move from the colony to the autonomous Province contributed to the conflict in Fiji (Loga et al., np). The study made two significant contributions: developing a theoretical understanding of conflict using the theory of reliance and revealing the legacy of colonization that established war in Fiji.

Douglas et a., (np) shapes a new approach to understanding the conflict and Christianity. In contrast, geo-political conflicts are rising worldwide, especially in fragile regions, as explored by Loga et al. (np). There is more than Christianity can do as a deterrent of conflict, but it must address the perception created by the colonial government in the country. It is essential to explore Fiji in its history of public administration, examine historical assets that have contributed to its ongoing conflicts, and examine how Christianity has contributed to the process.

Major Causes of Conflict

Racial competition for natural properties, political control, edification, and job prospects are considered causes of conflict and skirmish. More iTaukei point out that ‘politics has led to racism and racism. The previous government’s policies have contributed to the deterioration of interethnic relationships, and as a consequence, ‘racism’ is one of the significant problems in the world (Naidu, Vijay, et al., 27). It also emerged that there was a consensus that social and economic inequalities contributed to the international conflict. World news also functional to Melanesians.

Most have indicated that their access to property is not secure according to their plans. Their current home in Levuka was an Anglican church; however, it has returned to the landowners as the contract expires. One of the Melanesian men said that it was at the mercy of the landowners (Naidu, Vijay, et al., 27). The Church of England played a crucial role in reaching the country for the Melanesian people, but now it has improved as its employers. Most Indo-Fijians believe that they could practice their beliefs without anxiety and meet without restrictions for sacred purposes, but this was not the case until the Public Emergency Rules lifting.

In conclusion, the current multiracial studies offer very little attention to the colonial roots and policies that continue to shape integration, requiring greater sensitivity and compassion. As a result, it is a disease dangerous to Fijian natives where they occur in short supply. Post-independence administrations have followed inconsistent strategies of looking for national harmony and treating inhabitants differently bestowing to their origin. Different institutes convoyed by confirmatory achievement strategies that advantaged indigenous Fijians and their organizations.

Numerous investigative pieces have explored the conflict Fiji faces with an underlying aspect of governance at the core of the issues, which means the advanced religious concept needs to be relooked. It is essential that while advancing the liberties of individuals, diversity of the community addresses social injustices that were advanced in the past to ensure that reconciliation becomes part of the region’s culture. Christianity can and should be at the forefront in advocating for the same with action. Religion can be a helpful tool that promotes peace and integration if it is applied proactively within the social construct.

Work Cited

Craney, Aidan. “Fault lines for unrest in the Pacific: Youth, livelihoods and land rights in driving and mitigating conflict.” Asia Pacific Viewpoint (2021).

Douglas, Heather, Buriata Eti-Tofinga, and Gurmeet Singh. “Contextualising social enterprise in Fiji.” Social Enterprise Journal (2018).

Loga, Patricia, Andrew Cardow, and Andy Asquith. “Path-dependency theory in a post-conflict state: the case of Fiji.” Journal of Management History (2021).

Naidu, Vijay, et al. “Fiji: The challenges and opportunities of diversity.” (2013).

Ngin, Chanrith, et al. “The role of faith-based institutions in urban disaster risk reduction for immigrant communities.” Natural Hazards 103.1 (2020): 299-316.

The Mayan And Aztec In Mesoamerica Free Essay

The statement “unless the lion learns to write, the stories will always glorify the hunter” rightly applies in the analysis of the Mayan and Aztec communities that lived in Mesoamerica. Early Europeans credit themselves with instituting the initial and higher education centers in Mesoamerica in the sixteenth century. However, these two societies had well-established systems of instructing their community members, from the young ones up to specialized professions such as scribes and priests (Crum). Furthermore, the older of the two civilizations, Mayan, had an established and advanced system of knowledge that entailed astronomy and mathematics. Astoundingly, the first use of the number zero is traceable to these people (Crum). The Mayan and Aztec share entwined aspects, more so in the aspect of knowledge, writings, and religion.

Knowledge sharing was phenomenal, and a quite looked up to aspect of the community. Among the Aztecs, knowledge was shared in specialized learning institutions and at home. Knowledge was an essential element among the Aztecs as it predicted many things, especially central factors to the continuity of the civilization, such as writing and rulership. Education began at home, with the parents being critical educators of societal and survival norms (Root). Boys, for instance, would follow their parents in some hunting expeditions, learning how to trap and pursue animals for food, among other social needs such as their hides for ornamentation and some clothing. This process of learning from the parents would ensue for the children for a while until their early teenagerhood, whereby they would be eligible for enrollment into the specialized schools in place.

Learning among the Aztecs had caste as a central and defining factor in which schools individuals would be eligible to attend. Those of noble descent would attend schools often called the ‘calmecac,’ while the commoners would attend schools referred to as the ‘telpochcalli’ (Root). These two institutions were predominantly for the boys who had become of age. As for the girls, education took a different tangent as they trained in specific institutions where household skills were imparted. Furthermore, upon careful inspection and the determination of the community healers, the girls who were exceptional in their training were chosen as midwives.

The Mayan influence in knowledge upon the Aztec is considerable. The calmecacs, which were institutions for dispersing knowledge to the nobles, can be traced to the Mayan civilization. Furthermore, some Mayan-originated religious beliefs were adopted by the Aztecs in their social motions (Barone). Another area regarding their sharing of information regards their righting styles. The Aztec heavily adopted the hieroglyphic depictions and phonetics used by the Mayans, further enhancing them. According to Cartwright, “The Maya writing system continued to be used up to the Spanish Conquest, but this ‘pagan’ text was prohibited” (Cartwright). The influence of one civilization on the subsequent one, despite them being tens of decades apart, is quite phenomenal.

Furthermore, knowledge among the Mayan was a factor attributable to several societal gains, including a stature of political power and supremacy. Maya text and iconography became a contentious hot topic, leading to impositions on both the scribes and the community. Sovereignty was commonplace by integrating knowledge into leadership practicum (“Civilization.ca – Mystery of the Maya – Writing and Hieroglyphics”). The relationship between writing and power is evident in the depiction of the Mayan civilization. As the evolution of means to reproduce writing soon gained traction, this depiction became overtly associated with a loss of power for the community leaders. The ferocity of the issue was stark to the degree that captured scribes would be broken their fingers from the knuckles (Johnston 5). This move implied the discontinuity of the skill to share knowledge further.

Learning about world history as it pertains to education and writing is an efficacious manner of assessing the revolutions made in the education sector and a platform for self-reflection on whether things are getting better or society is regressing. An analysis of historical processes and endeavors in education remarkably reveals how knowledge was the esteem in antiquity. Moreover, education parallels war in terms of its value in establishing authority and control. This exact depiction is resonant in contemporary times as every government has a division that deals with information gathering and reconnaissance. The more information one has and the fewer others have, turns one into a force to be reckoned with. History teaches us what has worked in the past, and it facilitates as a crucible for testing what might work since history has the tendency to replicate over time.

The Mayan and Aztec societies represent some of the ancient Mesoamerican civilizations that had an astute bearing regarding their regard for knowledge. Though the Mayans came before the Aztecs, knowledge sharing ensued and offered compelling and evocative engagements in both societies. The Aztecs took the turn of ensuring the whole community received education right from childhood. The implication of this move was a sustained culture and community. On the other hand, the Mayans were careful to document their various progress in codices and other mediums, which led to other people’s benefitting from the knowledge. Ergo, it remains crucial to learn from our past and chronicle the best ideals that would befit the present generation and those to follow.

Works Cited

Barone, Fran. “Featured Culture: Aztecs, Cosmology, and Ancient Rituals in eHRAF.” Human Relations Area Files – Cultural Information for Education and Research, 23 Jan. 2019, hraf.yale.edu/featured-culture-aztecs-cosmology-and-ancient-rituals-in-ehraf.

Cartwright, Mark. “Maya Writing.” World History Encyclopedia, 23 Mar. 2022, www.worldhistory.org/article/655/maya-writing.

“Civilization.ca – Mystery of the Maya – Writing and Hieroglyphics.” History Museum, www.historymuseum.ca/cmc/exhibitions/civil/maya/mmc04eng.html. Accessed 25 Mar. 2022.

Crum, Steven. “Colleges Before Columbus: Mayans, Aztecs and Incas Offered Advanced Education Long before the Arrival of Europeans.” Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education, 7 June 2012, tribalcollegejournal.org/colleges-columbus-mayans-aztecs-incas-offered-advanced-education-long-arrival-europeans.

Johnston, Kevin J. “Broken fingers: The capture of the scribe in classic maya culture.” XVIII Symposium of Archaeological Investigations in Guatemala. Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies. 2009.

Root. “Aztec Education: Learning at Home and School.” History, 14 June 2018, www.historyonthenet.com/aztec-education-at-home-and-school.

The Media Has The Ability To Initiate Social Change Free Essay

Social change has been facilitated by media coverage and stories over decades. Besides, multiple communication and social theories elaborate on how the media enables social change. For example, there is a direct connection with how media influences society and people. Thus, the impact of media on social transformation entails multiple perspectives such as approaches of communication, social marketing, social learning, and democracy. Consequently, the increased circulation of propaganda, political information, and public opinions shapes society differently. Individuals learn from observation, and everything presented by the media enables them to develop different viewpoints that transform society. Young viewers can also imitate a movie or television scene perfectly, while others can imitate behaviors or images differently. Nevertheless, social change entails different steps whereby individuals transform from the information media presents to action. Therefore, the media has initiated social change. It has facilitated crucial social movements against injustices such as sex slavery, domestic, gender-based, and gun violence, allowing survivors to relay their personal experiences.

Media has become a tool for justice in society. Many people engage in social action calls when they read an incident on media forms such as television or newspapers. For instance, various social movements have been established to fight social justice, such as gender and economic equality. Moreover, people can relay their feelings towards social injustices in society. For example, social media enables people to communicate their messages and feelings to a wider audience. Individuals can share their personal stories on social media platforms to explain a specific message. The issues of sexual abuse, domestic violence, and crime can be effectively combated through media awareness because most people can develop ways to stop these social vices that affect the psychological and physical well-being of people in society.

Also, sharing personal stories on media assists survivors or victims to know that they are not alone. However, the mainstream media provides a different perspective of most stories by supporting the perpetrators and facilitating stereotypes. Social media allows advocates or survivors to share information and respond to specific events without promoting biased information. Nevertheless, social media has provided a platform where individuals can share their personal stories and experiences. Thus, society can use the information to plan on the best course of action to facilitate social change. Activists use social media as a tool for transformation because they can encourage other users to engage in current events and solidarity with political or social movements. Information on gender-based violence can change the societal perspective towards women if the information is shared on social media. This will facilitate a radical call to action for perpetrators and practices that seem to cause victimization.

Moreover, social media gives people the power to condemn injustices in society and promote real contexts. Hashtags are important because they can change personal movements into unified and extensive forces in the current world. For example, the Black Lives Matter Movement promoted the “Say Her Name” hashtag. This hashtag was crucial because it promoted awareness of gender-based violence against Black American women, which was not successful through other forms of media. Also, the hashtag enabled the rise of other social action groups such as anti-violence against women and anti-gun violence, and they have facilitated unity in the world against social vices. Hashtags on domestic violence and gun violence have enabled the survivors to present their experiences to diminish the inaccuracies and stereotypical information that the media gives. They provide an understanding of why people leave their families or marriages. Therefore, the media enhances social change since people can use social media power to facilitate social transformation in a place where social injustices and vices such as gender-based violence and gun violence are limited.

Nevertheless, the media provides diverse perspectives on society. Most media stations and websites offer various stories on the lives of individuals. Sometimes television or online news websites provide biased information on common social topics such as gender or domestic violence. For example, sex slavery was prevalent, and the media promoted misinformation about victims’ experiences. However, the personal stories of survivors provide fundamental insights into how it occurs and its effects on people. In “The Diary of an Escaped Sex Slave,” Sreypov Chan elaborates her story and explains how she was forced to engage in sexual intercourse with numerous men at ten years. The painful past experiences facilitated her hopeful future. Her story shed light on how many women who encounter the same fate cannot share their stories based on how the media shows their experiences in a biased way.

Furthermore, Benjamin Skinner’s “Slavery’s staying in power” highlights how sexual slavery is still prevalent in the current society. Skinner highlights his personal experiences on how she was introduced to a woman who had tried to commit suicide many times. The woman was being sold to clients against her will, and Skinner uncovered many human trafficking networks where people are sold, increasing slavery in society. Thus, Skinner shows how children and women are sold across the national border daily to be used as sex dolls. His story provides insights into how the media has fought against slavery through news posts and opinions on television shows and newspapers to enable social change.

Ultimately, “Death Constant Beyond Love” reflects on a dying senator and how a man offers his daughter to him so that he can take care of legal matters for him. However, the senator dies while in bed with the woman before he can sleep with her. This influences disgrace and scandal in his family. In the story, Gabriel Garcia Marquez reflects on sexual slavery too. She highlights how some parents can easily give away their children to work s sex dolls so that they can solve their issues. Hence, the information has encouraged the war of sex slavery, and many social movements have facilitated actions against it, enabling the survivors to share their stories effectively. As a result, this has enhanced action through social groups and activists’ movements. They ensure that the victims are liberated and their stories are heard.

Conclusion

The media has initiated social change. It has facilitated crucial social movements against injustices such as sex slavery, domestic, gender-based, and gun violence, allowing survivors to relay their personal experiences. Moreover, media has become a tool for justice in society. Many people engage in social action calls when they read an incident on media forms such as television or newspapers. Furthermore, sharing personal stories on media assists survivors or victims to know that they are not alone. Also, social media gives people the power to condemn injustices in society and promote real contexts. The media provides diverse perspectives on society. Most media stations and websites provide various stories on the lives of individuals. Benjamin Skinner’s “Slavery’s staying in power” highlights how sexual slavery is still prevalent in the current society. Therefore, this has facilitated a war against gender-based violence or gun-related crimes whereby social action groups, movements, and hashtags have promoted social change.

Works Cited

García Márquez, Gabriel. “Death Constant Beyond Love.” Collected Stories (1984): pp 237-45. file:///C:/Users/Admin/Downloads/DeathConstantBeyondLovebyGabrielGarciaMarquez.pdf

Kraidy, Marwan M. “Social change and the media.” (2002): pp 1-5. https://repository.upenn.edu/asc_papers/328/

Pesta, Abigail. “Diary of an Escaped Sex Slave.” MarieClaire (2011): pp 1-9 https://www.marieclaire.com/politics/news/a3618/diary-escaped-sex-slave/

Skinner, Benjamin. “Slavery’s Staying Power” Los Angeles Times. (2008): pp 1-3. file:///C:/Users/Admin/Downloads/Slavery’sStayingPower-1.pdf